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Astronomy Calendar of Celestial Events

  1. May 2, 2014 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. May 9, 2014 #2
    Look to Saturn tomorrow night!

    May 10 - Saturn at Opposition. The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.
     
  4. May 10, 2014 #3
    Today is also Astronomy Day! Get outside and look up! :)
     
  5. May 10, 2014 #4

    davenn

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    maybe will see Saturn tonite ... been battling cloudy nights here :frown:

    Dave
     
  6. May 28, 2014 #5

    PhysicoRaj

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    Aw mann..:grumpy: clouds everywhere? Would a vortex cannon do for white thin clouds? There are four planets visible: Mercury, Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. Damn weather :frown:
     
  7. Jun 3, 2014 #6
    June 7 - Conjunction of the Moon and Mars. The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky. The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8. Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset. The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.
     
  8. Jul 12, 2014 #7
  9. Jul 14, 2014 #8

    PhysicoRaj

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  10. Jul 22, 2014 #9
    July 28, 29 - Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht. The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29. This should be a great year for this shower because the thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
     
  11. Oct 4, 2014 #10

    Redbelly98

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    Total lunar eclipse coming up this Wednesday, Oct. 8.

    From http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/lunar/2014-october-8 :

    path720.png
    Map Legend
    Intense red shading: Observers within this area can see the eclipse from beginning to end.
    Red shading left/west of intense shading: Eclipse during end of day/start of night: Can see the eclipse after moonrise/sunset.
    Red shading right/east of intense shading: Eclipse during end of night/start of day: Can see the eclipse until moonset/sunrise.
    No coloring: Eclipse is not visible at all
    Note: Actual eclipse visibility depends on weather conditions and line of sight to the Moon.

    Central and eastern time zones will see it in the early hours just prior to sunrise. It will be earlier for western time zone, obviously.
     
  12. Oct 20, 2014 #11
    • October 20, 21 - Orionids Meteor Shower. The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 20 and the morning of October 21. This will be an excellent year for the Orionids because there will be no moon to interfere with the show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
     
  13. Nov 10, 2014 #12
    • November 17, 18 - Leonids Meteor Shower. The Leonids is an average shower, producing an average of up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th. The waning crescent moon will not be much of a problem this year. Skies should be dark enough for a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
     
  14. Nov 12, 2014 #13

    davenn

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    The last Leonids shower I made significant effort to observe was in the mid-late 1990's
    when I was back in Dunedin, NZ
    The meteors observed were relatively slow and produced persistent trails stretching across 1/2 the sky
    Had, up till that time never seen meteor trails like that

    Dave
     
  15. Nov 12, 2014 #14

    dlgoff

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    I'll have a beer in hand and watching as always ... Until the cold gets to me.
     
  16. Nov 18, 2014 #15

    davenn

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    well as with 2 other significant astro events this year, it was also clouded out :(
    The sky was crystal clear till 1 am then clouded over

    Dave
     
  17. Nov 18, 2014 #16

    dlgoff

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    I thought about going out last night, but it was so cold my beer would have frozen. According to my weather station it was 12°F at midnight. :mad:
     
  18. Dec 3, 2014 #17
  19. Apr 21, 2015 #18
    Lyrids: Annual Meteor Shower Expected to Be Visible This Week
     
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