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Bijection between infinite bases of vector spaces

  1. Nov 17, 2007 #1
    I am reading "The linear algebra a beginning graduate student ought to know" by Golan, and I encountered a puzzling statement:

    Let V be a vector space (not necessarily finitely generated) over a field F. Prove that there exists a bijective function between any two bases of V. Hint: Use transfinite induction.

    If V is generated by a finite set (with n elements), then I know how to prove that any basis has at most n elements, and thus all bases will have the same number of elements. But for infinite-dimensional vector spaces, I'm confused. How do I use transfinite induction to prove that there is a bijective correspondence between two bases of V if V is infinite-dimensional?

    Sorry: I moved this to the algebra forum.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 17, 2007 #2
    I think I have a solution now. Here it is. Opinions are welcomed.
     

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