Bose Stars (dark matter in origin)

In summary, Bose Stars are hypothetical astronomical objects made up of Bose-Einstein condensates, and are believed to be related to dark matter due to their composition of particles with integer spin. They are thought to have formed in the early universe and their existence could potentially have significant implications for our understanding of dark matter and the formation of supermassive black holes. However, they have yet to be observed or detected, and their small size and lack of electromagnetic radiation make them difficult to study. The discovery of Bose Stars could also provide valuable insights into the fundamental nature of matter and lead to new technologies.
  • #1
unusually_wrong
37
7
https://www.sciencealert.com/matehmatical-model-of-cold-dark-matter-bose-einstein-condensate-stars

dark matter could be clumping into cold droplets called 'Bose stars'.

"After a very long period, 100,000 times longer than the time needed for a particle to cross the simulation volume, the particles spontaneously formed a condensate, which immediately shaped itself into a spherical droplet, a Bose star, under the effect of gravity."

Interesting read. Thoughts and comments?
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
These things always tend to violate constraints from microlensing if they are supposed to play a strong role.
 

Related to Bose Stars (dark matter in origin)

1. What are Bose Stars and how are they related to dark matter?

Bose Stars are hypothetical astronomical objects that are made up of Bose-Einstein condensates, which are a state of matter composed of bosons (particles with integer spin). Dark matter is also thought to be composed of particles with integer spin, so Bose Stars are believed to be one possible explanation for the composition of dark matter.

2. How are Bose Stars formed?

Bose Stars are thought to be formed in the early universe when bosons were densely packed together due to the high temperatures and pressures. As the universe expanded and cooled, the bosons were able to form into Bose-Einstein condensates and eventually collapse into Bose Stars due to gravity.

3. Can Bose Stars be observed or detected?

Currently, there is no observational evidence for the existence of Bose Stars. They are purely theoretical objects and their small size and lack of electromagnetic radiation make them difficult to detect. However, scientists are working on potential ways to detect them, such as through gravitational lensing effects or particle accelerators.

4. What impact would the discovery of Bose Stars have on our understanding of dark matter?

The discovery of Bose Stars would provide strong evidence for the existence of dark matter and potentially help us better understand its properties. It could also lead to the development of new theories and models for dark matter that incorporate Bose-Einstein condensates.

5. Are there any other potential implications of Bose Stars beyond dark matter?

Some scientists have proposed that Bose Stars could also be responsible for the formation of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Additionally, the study of Bose-Einstein condensates and Bose Stars could provide valuable insights into the fundamental nature of matter and potentially lead to new technologies.

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