Calculate distance given accleration, initial & final speed

In summary, to calculate distance given acceleration, initial speed, and final speed, you can use the formula: d = (vf^2-vi^2) / 2a. Acceleration is typically measured in meters per second squared (m/s^2), while speed and distance can be measured in any units of length such as meters (m), kilometers (km), or miles (mi). If the acceleration is negative, it means that the object is decelerating or slowing down, and this value should be used in the formula. This formula can be used for any type of motion where acceleration is constant, including both linear and circular motion. However, it cannot be used to find the distance traveled in a specific time period.
  • #1
AQuestionX
1
0
dleted due to error
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The equation you've used is finding time, not distance.

The equation to use in this case is:

[tex]v^2 = u^2 + 2as[/tex]

Where v is the final speed, u is the initial speed, a is the acceleration and s is the displacement.

Rearrange this to find s.

Remember that the driver is decelerating, so the acceleration is -2.68 ms^-2.
 

1. How do you calculate distance given acceleration, initial speed, and final speed?

To calculate distance, you can use the formula: d = (vf^2-vi^2) / 2a, where d is the distance, vf is the final speed, vi is the initial speed, and a is the acceleration.

2. What units should be used for acceleration, initial speed, final speed, and distance?

Acceleration is typically measured in meters per second squared (m/s^2), while speed and distance can be measured in any units of length such as meters (m), kilometers (km), or miles (mi).

3. What if the acceleration is negative?

If the acceleration is negative, it means that the object is decelerating or slowing down. In this case, you would use the negative value in the formula and the resulting distance would be negative as well.

4. Can this formula be used for any type of motion?

Yes, this formula can be used for any type of motion where acceleration is constant. This includes both linear and circular motion.

5. Can this formula be used for finding the distance traveled in a specific time period?

No, this formula only calculates the total distance traveled. To find the distance traveled in a specific time period, you would need to use a different formula such as d = vit + 1/2at^2, where t is the time interval.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
540
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
269
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
144
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
256
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
398
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
699
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
849
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
998
Back
Top