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Homework Help: Calculate speed according to distance, gravity and h-angle.

  1. Dec 10, 2017 #1
    Hi there, so I wanna know how to get the speed I need to move some object from point A to B, accordint to the distance between points, gravity and height angle.
    I means, I have this:
    height angle = 40.0
    distance from point A to B = 5m
    gravity = -9.81
    speed = ?

    I think that I just need to know the first 3 datas to get the formula.
    Sorry if I explained bad, let me know and I'll try to explain this better.
    Kind regards.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 10, 2017 #2

    haruspex

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    Science Advisor
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    Gold Member

    Where is A in relation to B? 5m horizontally on the same level? 5m straight up the slope at 40 degrees?
    Is the object being shot through the air or up a ramp? Any resistive forces, like friction?
    What equations can you quote that might be useful here?
    (You should complete the template, not delete it.)
     
  4. Dec 10, 2017 #3
    Sorry, I'm new here.

    Point A is anywhere in the X, Y axis, same for point B.
    I'm working in a 3D model, so I think Z ground is a factor here. I'm not using resistive forces btw.

    Let me explain it better:
    I have a ball in the next coords: 50.0, 25.0, 3.0 (point A)
    And I want to "launch" it (simulate a parabolic movement) to the next coord: 50.0, 30.0, 3.0 (point B).
    There's a distance of 5m between those points.
    With the next values: gravity = 9.81, height angle = 40.0, I want to know how many velocity I need so ball can fall over point B.

    Sorry for delete template, really don't know what I had to do there lol
     
  5. Dec 10, 2017 #4

    haruspex

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    Science Advisor
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    Gold Member

    Ok, so they are at the same height.
    You need state any equations, theory, or conservation laws that you think might be relevant, and show some attempt at using these to solve the problem, or at least some thoughts on the matter.
     
  6. Dec 11, 2017 #5

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    The sections are pretty much self-explanatory, with complete problem statement in first section, relevant equations in the second section, and your attempts in the third section. The homework template is required.

    Points A and B are in the x-y plane.

    Thread closed. Please start a new thread, using the completed homework template, and showing some effort toward the solution of this problem.
     
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