Calculating Average Acceleration

In summary, the conversation is about calculating average acceleration and whether or not to include the value of 0 in the calculation. The speaker initially thought they should include 0, but then realizes that it shouldn't be included since the object was being held initially. They also mention that they are doing a lab on calculating "g" for a free-falling object.
  • #1
rachelle
18
0
Hi, this may seem like a silly question, but I'm gunna ask it anyway...

I have the ff. data for acceleration:

0  
9.152
8.43
9.07
7.731
10.423

When I calculate the average acceleration, would it be the sum divided by 6 or would it be the sum divided by 5? That is, should I include the "0" in calculating my average?

Thanks in advance~
 
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  • #2
rachelle said:
... That is, should I include the "0" in calculating my average?

Since 0 is a value as any other one, you must include it.
 
  • #3
Thanks!

~rachelle
 
  • #4
Hmm.. sorry, follow-up question...

What if I'm calculating my average acceleration for gravity, do I need to include the "0" then?

It's just that when I didn't include the "0" on my calculations, it was nearer the true value of "g" (9.81)
But when I included zero in calculating my average, it was a little far off...

ps: I'm doing my lab on calculating "g" free-falling object
 
  • #5
rachelle said:
Hmm.. sorry, follow-up question...

What if I'm calculating my average acceleration for gravity, do I need to include the "0" then?

It's just that when I didn't include the "0" on my calculations, it was nearer the true value of "g" (9.81)
But when I included zero in calculating my average, it was a little far off...

ps: I'm doing my lab on calculating "g" free-falling object

Hm, in that case, if 0 is the value that was attained while the object was being held (which is obvious), then you shouldn't include it. (Unless I'm missing something.)
 
  • #6
Oh sorry, I guess you are right! Actually, the Time column shows "0" but the Acceleration column shows blank (so was the Velocity & Distance columns for the first row). I just assumed initial Acceleration will be 0 and include it on calculating the average acceleration, when in fact like you said it shouldn't be included because the object was being held initially, before I dropped it.

Gah.. I feel stupid! Thanks for your help :)
 

Related to Calculating Average Acceleration

1. What is average acceleration?

Average acceleration is the rate at which the velocity of an object changes over a certain period of time. It is calculated by dividing the change in velocity by the change in time.

2. How do you calculate average acceleration?

To calculate average acceleration, you first need to determine the initial velocity and final velocity of the object. Then, subtract the initial velocity from the final velocity to find the change in velocity. Finally, divide the change in velocity by the change in time to find the average acceleration.

3. What units are used to measure average acceleration?

The units for average acceleration are typically meters per second squared (m/s^2) in the metric system or feet per second squared (ft/s^2) in the imperial system.

4. Can average acceleration be negative?

Yes, average acceleration can be negative. This means that the object is decelerating or slowing down in the direction of motion. Positive average acceleration indicates that the object is accelerating or speeding up in the direction of motion.

5. How is average acceleration related to velocity and time?

Average acceleration is directly proportional to the change in velocity and inversely proportional to the change in time. This means that as the change in velocity increases, the average acceleration also increases, while as the change in time increases, the average acceleration decreases.

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