Calculating Average Speed and Acceleration for a Fastball

In summary, the conversation discussed the calculation of average speed and acceleration of a fastball thrown to home plate in .4 seconds. The average speed was determined to be 50m/s and the acceleration was still being calculated. Various kinematic equations were suggested to help find a time-independent relation between distance, velocity, and acceleration.
  • #1
ckaybabii
4
0
Acceleration HELP!

A fastball that traveled to home plate (20 meters) in .4seconds.

a.what is the average speed of the ball?
b.if the catcher allowed his mitt to recoil backwards 7cm while catching the ball, what was the acceleration of the ball while it was slowed down by the catcher?
c.what amount of time was used to slow the ball down?

ATTEMPT
d/t=ave velocity= 50m/s^2
Vo=50m/s
Vf=0
t=.4s
d=20m
.07/25=.0028=t


-I don't know if my calculations are all correct please help me. I have the answer to a. which is 50m, just not to b, and c.
 
Last edited:
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  • #2


a. average speed is defined as the time taken to travel a certain distance.
b. [tex]F=m\frac{dv}{dt}[/tex]
c. see b
 
  • #3


what is F and m? sorry i haven't learned that just yet.
 
  • #4


F is force, and m is mass.

I don't see how that would help in this case, as you have none of either.
 
  • #6


Okay but I am not looking for Force or Mass though.
 
  • #7


There a couple of kinematics equations that will help you. I highly suggest memorizing these (there are a few others that definitely worth memorizing too). :smile:

Assuming a constant acceleration,

[tex] s = \frac{v_f + v_i}{2}t + s_i[/tex]

and

[tex] s = \frac{1}{2}at^2 +v_it +s_i[/tex]

(In many problems, [tex] s_i [/tex] is zero. And often times, either [tex] v_i [/tex] or [tex] v_f [/tex] is zero. But it doesn't hurt to memorize them in their full form.)

[Edit]: These equations might be in a slightly different form in your textbook (or your instructors notes). In order to stay consistent with the class material, I suggest using textbook's (or your instructor's) notation.
 
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  • #8


Oh, sorry I misread the question.

Because time isn't explicit you have to use some kinematic equations.
Try to get a time-independent relation between d, v and a from these relations.

[tex]d=v_it+\frac{1}{2}at^2[/tex]
[tex]v_f=v_i+at[/tex]
 
  • #9


Okay thank you every 1 I will keep trying.
 

1. How do you calculate the average speed of a fastball?

The average speed of a fastball can be calculated by dividing the distance the ball traveled by the time it took to travel that distance. This can be measured using a radar gun or by timing the pitch from release to home plate.

2. What is the formula for calculating average acceleration of a fastball?

The formula for average acceleration is change in velocity divided by change in time. In the case of a fastball, this would be the change in speed divided by the time it took for the pitch to reach home plate.

3. How does air resistance affect the calculations of average speed and acceleration for a fastball?

Air resistance can significantly affect the speed and acceleration of a fastball, as it creates drag and slows down the ball. To account for this, scientists often use specialized equipment, such as a high-speed camera, to measure the actual speed and acceleration of the ball without the interference of air resistance.

4. Can the average speed and acceleration of a fastball vary between pitchers?

Yes, the average speed and acceleration of a fastball can vary between pitchers. Factors such as arm strength, technique, and release point can all impact the velocity and acceleration of a fastball.

5. How can calculating average speed and acceleration of a fastball help in training and performance improvement?

Calculating average speed and acceleration of a fastball can provide valuable data for pitchers and coaches to analyze and improve performance. By tracking these metrics, pitchers can identify areas for improvement and make adjustments to their technique, strength, or training regimen to increase their speed and acceleration.

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