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Calculating the force between two electrons in a wire

  1. Feb 2, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    An infinite line charge (wire) has lambda = lambda0. It produces an electric field of magnitude 5E4 N/C at a distance of 2m. Determine the typical force between two adjacent extra electrons in the wire


    2. Relevant equations
    E_line = lambda/(2pi*r*epsilon0)

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I managed to find lambda0 using the above equation, but now I'm stuck trying to find the force between the two electrons, how do I find thelectricity e spacing between them given the linear charge density, can anyone help me?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2017 #2

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    What are the units of λ?
     
  4. Feb 2, 2017 #3
    C/m
     
  5. Feb 2, 2017 #4

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    Right. So how many electron charges make up a Coulomb?
     
  6. Feb 2, 2017 #5
    1/1.6E-19 = 6.25E18 electrons
     
  7. Feb 2, 2017 #6

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    So how many electrons per meter for your value of λ?
     
  8. Feb 2, 2017 #7
    epsilon0 * 5E4 *4pi*6.25E18 electrons per meter I believe
     
  9. Feb 2, 2017 #8

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    Okay. What's the result of the calculation? What does it tell you about the meters per electron?
     
  10. Feb 2, 2017 #9
    I finally got it, I inverted the calculation to get the meters per electron which was about 2.9E-14 m per electron, then used this with coulomb's law to get .28N, thank you so much, my professor was giving me cryptic hints when I emailed him.
     
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