Calculating Total Length of Car's Breaking Path with a=4 m/s^2

In summary, the problem involves finding the total length of the traveled path during braking with a given acceleration of 4 m/s^2. The solution is s = a/2(sqrt(5)/(sqrt(5)-2))^2 and it can be solved using standard constant acceleration equations for distance.
  • #1
Hristijan1992
4
0

Homework Statement


During the testing of the break of car, observed that in the first second of the start of breaking the car past one fifth of the total path. What is the total length of the traveled way during the breaking, if the acceleration is a=4 m/s^2 ?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

https://www.physicsforums.com/newthread.php?do=newthread&f=154
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF!

Hi Hristijan1992! Welcome to PF! :smile:

(btw, it's "brake" and "braking" :wink:)

erm :redface: … your solution hasn't come out, the link isn't working!

I assume you used the standard constant acceleration equations?

Show us what you get. :smile:
 
  • #3
The solution is : s=a/2(sqrt(5)/(sqrt(5)-2))^2 but i don't know how can i solve the problem...
 
  • #4
Hi Hristijan1992! :wink:

(have a square-root: √ and try using the X2 icon just above the Reply box :wink:)

Call the stopping distance s, and write one of the standard constant acceleration equations for distance = s (with vf = 0), and another for distance = s/5 (with t = 1).

Show us what you get. :smile:
 
  • #5
i can't solve it ... Please if anyone can show me what is the problem... i must solve it ...
 
  • #6
Sorry, on this forum you have to do it yourself. :wink:

Show us what you've tried, and where you're stuck, and then we'll know how to help! :smile:
 
  • #7
yay :D :)) i solve it. Thank you very much :))
 

Related to Calculating Total Length of Car's Breaking Path with a=4 m/s^2

1. How do I calculate the total length of a car's breaking path with an acceleration of 4 m/s^2?

The total length of a car's breaking path can be calculated by using the formula: length = (initial velocity)^2 / (2 x acceleration). In this case, the initial velocity is typically assumed to be 0 m/s, so the formula would simplify to length = (0)^2 / (2 x 4) = 0 meters.

2. What is the importance of calculating a car's breaking path length?

Calculating a car's breaking path length is important because it helps determine the distance that a car will need to come to a complete stop in emergency situations. This information is crucial for safe driving and can help prevent accidents.

3. How does the acceleration of a car affect its breaking path length?

The acceleration of a car directly affects its breaking path length. The higher the acceleration, the shorter the breaking path length will be. This is because a higher acceleration means that the car can come to a complete stop in a shorter distance.

4. Are there any other factors that can affect a car's breaking path length?

Yes, there are other factors that can affect a car's breaking path length. These include the type and condition of the brakes, the weight and speed of the car, and the road conditions (e.g. wet or dry pavement). The formula for calculating breaking path length assumes ideal conditions, so the actual breaking path length may vary.

5. How can I use the calculated breaking path length in practical situations?

The calculated breaking path length can be used in practical situations by providing a guideline for the minimum safe following distance between cars. It can also be used to determine the appropriate speed for driving in certain road conditions, such as during rain or snow. Additionally, having an understanding of breaking path length can help drivers make more informed decisions while on the road.

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