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Calling builders and handymen - I need ideas for a patio roof

  1. Sep 6, 2010 #1

    DaveC426913

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    I've finished my cedar deck and now wish to cover it with a pergola. Trouble is, my requirements are, at first glance, mutually incompatible.

    I want it to be rain-proof but I don't want it to be so solid that it looks and sounds like a solid roof.

    I've been looking at these corrugated acrylic panels, which meet two out of three requirements, but I think that they will echo like there's a roof over your head. That's one of the things I really want to avoid.

    I've also thought about canvas, which would sort of be rain-proof, would sort of let light in and would definitely not reflect sound but, living in Canada, it wouldn't last very long. Besides, with the amount of trees here, it would get covered in dirt very quickly. AndI want it to be virtually zero maintenance.

    Do you have any ideas how I could keep the rain out while keeping the light, airy, outdoor feel?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2010 #2

    CompuChip

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    I'm not sure if this is the type of material you are looking for, or if it is freely (as in: not attached to garden furniture) available. But this spring we bought a swing seat, which looks almost exactly like this one, http://www.gardenfurnitureworld.com/p/West_Virginia_3_Seat_Swing_Seat.htm# [Broken]. It says the material of the seats is textilene (never heard of it), and I think that the roof is made of the same stuff. It is light and flexible (like normal fabric) but it feels a bit like plastic, water rolls right off it. The other day we had some rain with wind gusts and it looked soaked, but after 5 minutes of wind and sun it was almost completely dry.

    How it holds up in winter, we'll have to see, but maybe my suggestion is a tiny little bit useful.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Sep 6, 2010 #3
    This would be the Dutch solution
     
  5. Sep 6, 2010 #4

    Danger

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    From memories of hiding under trees during heavy inland BC rains, I can say for sure that cedar boughs would meet your requirements. The problem is that they would have to be vertically separated similar to the way that they are on an actual tree. If you just layer them on top of each other, the light and breeze would be blocked.

    edit: I don't know how often they would have to be replaced.
     
  6. Sep 6, 2010 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    Why use corrugated? Why not just use flat, acrylic, or plexiglass sheets? That should help to reduce the noise factor if they are heavy enough. Also, I think the noise level can be reduced by increasing the number of braces [shorter runs for the vibrations].

    How is the frame constructed?
     
  7. Sep 6, 2010 #6

    DaveC426913

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    Yes, that is exactly the thing I mentioned in my OP. I feel that it will be too acoustically reflective, and will make the space sound like it's enclosed.
     
  8. Sep 6, 2010 #7

    DaveC426913

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    ??

    The noise is due to acoustic reflection from below.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2010 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    Oh, I thought you meant noise from the rain. That too can be an issue, at least here in Oregon; esp on corrugated metal roofs over shops! Plastic isn't as bad, but it can get pretty noisy too.

    Maybe you could damp the sounds in some other way. The trouble is that most anything that damps sound, doesn't do well in damp weather... Is this really an issue? It strikes me a bit as overkill.
     
  10. Sep 6, 2010 #9
    Is acrylic PVC?
     
  11. Sep 6, 2010 #10
    Better to look good than to feel good so I say do away with the rain-proofing and just build a nice looking pergola with just wood beams but stylish. I've built a few out of treated pine.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
  12. Sep 6, 2010 #11
    why use canvas and not some type of polymer fiber? you could probably wash it down with a hose and maybe some sodium phosphate. the trampoline i had as a kid lasted for ages in the sun. the black pigment may have given it some UV resistance, tho.
     
  13. Sep 6, 2010 #12

    DaveC426913

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    Simply wood will damp sound. Now I'm thinking maybe a plexiglass roof for rain protection over a wood slatted pergola.


    Sorry, don't misunderstand, I'm not trying to overkill this. If I put up a plexiglass or acrylic roof, I am convinced that when we are talking and eating and drinking, it will sound like we are under a roof. My enjoyment of the outdoors is predicated on the perception of being outdoors. If it ruins the impression, then the pergola is worse than useless.

    Another way to do it is to raise the ceiling quite a bit. Eleven feet or more and maybe the airiness will be evident.
     
  14. Sep 6, 2010 #13

    DaveC426913

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    How much light would it let through? Thin white canvas should let some diffuse light but I don't think it would be enough.
     
  15. Sep 6, 2010 #14

    lisab

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    I have no experience with these "sail shades", and they may require more maintenance than you want to do. Also not sure if you'd be able to keep it up during winter; the weight of snow and ice may ruin it. But they look nice.

    [PLAIN]http://www.westernawnings.com/Photos/shade%20sail_01.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  16. Sep 6, 2010 #15

    Redbelly98

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    No, acrylic is the same as plexiglass.
     
  17. Sep 6, 2010 #16
    the stuff i'm thinking of wouldn't let a large amount through.
     
  18. Sep 6, 2010 #17

    DaveC426913

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    I want light.
     
  19. Sep 7, 2010 #18
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  20. Sep 7, 2010 #19
    Interesting coincidence. I am moving in with my grandparents soon because my grandfather is in home hospice care and I will be helping out around the house. The first issue is cleaning the house out to make it properly livable but my first real project I would like to be making the patio a nice place for my grandparents to sit and relax and have guests. My ideas include a patio cover but mostly for the sun (being in Southern California).

    More ideas would be nice. My first instinct was something like a pergoda, providing shade but letting in light. Now I am considering a cloth/canvas tarp but I am worried about weathering. Something that requires little attention and maintenance would be preferable.
     
  21. Sep 7, 2010 #20

    turbo

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    People who lived about a block away from us had a nice back deck, but it didn't get used much in the heat of summer because it got direct sun all afternoon and early evening. Then they bought and installed a retractable awning, and started spending a LOT of time out there. It functions just like the side-awnings you see on travel-trailers, and rolls up under a protective shroud when retracted.
     
  22. Sep 7, 2010 #21

    DaveC426913

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    Yes, that is one of my options.
     
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