Can an IPOD be recharged using electrolytes?

  • Thread starter 1calculus1
  • Start date
In summary, the onion and USB charger may be able to create an electrical current, but I think it is more likely that the video is fake.
  • #1
1calculus1
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  • #2
It looks like a pretty straightforward application to me. Obviously the pin connectors for the USB charger are composed of a different metal than the negative housing. The 'electrolytes' are a salt bridge between the negative side and the positive pins in the USB charger cable. The USB cable acts as a limited use battery (and an expensive one too) which partially charges the battery in the IPOD. I suspect the copper components pretty quickly corrode away and the trick doesn't work for long... neither does the USB cable.
 
  • #3
It is interesting that you should take this video at face value, chemisttree.
I am far more skeptical of its validity, especially when considering the other videos that same YouTube user puts out which are even more difficult to believe (for example, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rA-zhTJuFU&feature=related").

Although it is not entirely implausible to think that some type of voltaic cell is being constructed using the onion and USB charger, I think a more likely explanation is that the video is faked.

I do not know what types of metals they use to make USB plugs (perhaps Copper, Gold, Nickel, or steel), but whatever they are they are probably not that far apart in their reduction potentials. The voltage from such a cell would probably not be very high, and in order for it to recharge the battery it would need to be at least 3.7 volts (the voltage of the Li-ion battery the iPod uses).
Not to mention the very small reaction area over which the redox reaction could occur, the so the current would be very limited and the voltaic cell would supply a very small power.

How do we know that the iPod in the video is actually operating on the ‘power’ supplied by the onion-cell? For all we know it does have internal battery power and that is what it is using and off-camera someone turned it on when we (the viewers) could not see.
Perhaps another possibility is that the iPod turns itself on when it detects a closed-circuit in its battery charger (I don’t have an iPod, so I cannot check this).
 
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  • #4
It's garbage.

- Warren
 
  • #5
mrjeffy321 said:
It is interesting that you should take this video at face value, chemisttree.
I am far more skeptical of its validity, especially when considering the other videos that same YouTube user puts out which are even more difficult to believe (for example, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rA-zhTJuFU&feature=related").

Although it is not entirely implausible to think that some type of voltaic cell is being constructed using the onion and USB charger, I think a more likely explanation is that the video is faked.

Whaaaat? You think someone could have faked a YouTube video? Say it ain't so!
 
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  • #6
Does look extremely garbage, the only explanation I could think of for this working is making a galvanic cell within the actual USB port maybe?
 
  • #7
Yes, and that current might be sufficient to cause a signal in the IPOD and cause it to wake up and display the charging icon (as MrJeffy has suggested).
 

Related to Can an IPOD be recharged using electrolytes?

1.

Can an IPOD be recharged using electrolytes?

Yes, it is possible to recharge an IPOD using electrolytes. However, not all IPOD models are compatible with this method of charging.

2.

How does recharging an IPOD using electrolytes work?

Electrolytes are substances that conduct electricity when dissolved in water. When an IPOD is connected to a power source containing electrolytes, the positively charged ions from the electrolytes move towards the negative electrode of the IPOD, thus recharging the device.

3.

What type of electrolytes should be used to recharge an IPOD?

The electrolytes used should have a high concentration of positively charged ions, such as sodium, potassium, and magnesium. It is important to use electrolytes that are safe and appropriate for electronic devices.

4.

Are there any risks involved in recharging an IPOD using electrolytes?

There are some risks involved, such as damaging the IPOD if the wrong type or concentration of electrolytes is used. It is important to follow the manufacturer's instructions and use only recommended electrolytes.

5.

Is recharging an IPOD using electrolytes more efficient than traditional charging methods?

It depends on the specific model and type of IPOD. Some models may charge faster using electrolytes, while others may not show significant improvement. It is recommended to test this method and compare it with other charging methods to determine which one is more efficient for a particular IPOD.

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