Can dark matter be trans-Seaborg elements?

  • Thread starter squidsoft
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello everyone.

May I ask if it's possible dark matter consists of trans-Seaborg elements beyond atomic number 126? Seaborg hypothesized that these elements were an "island of stability" and may be stable. Would we know enough of the chemical properties of such new elements to say that this cannot be dark matter?

Thanks,
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Yes, we do know enough to say that they could not be dark matter. Dark matter is detected by gravitational effects and undetecable by emitted radiation - regaurless of the chemical properties of the super massive elements, they are still baryonic matter, and would still interact with electromagnetic fields and emit radiation. Dark matter does not, and thus, mostly is believed to contain no atoms, regaurdless of size.
 
  • #3
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Ok. Thank you.
 
  • #4
cjl
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In addition, due to the constraints of baryon to photon ratio from big bang nucleosynthesis, the maximum baryonic omega is only in the neighborhood of 0.04 or so, far below the 0.3 value for omega matter. Therefore, there has to be a decent amount of non-baryonic matter out there (in fact, there has to be quite a bit more non baryonic than baryonic), again eliminating super heavy elements as a possibility.
 

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