Can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed from a telescope on Earth?

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of radio telescopes to capture images of faint objects, specifically Einstein rings, from Earth. It is mentioned that radio telescopes are more effective than optical telescopes due to the less absorption of microwaves by clouds and water vapor in the atmosphere. The conversation also mentions that the observation of these objects requires a high-powered reflective telescope and that the size of the human pupil can be used to calculate the light gathering area of a telescope. Overall, the conversation highlights the advancements in technology and tools used by humans to study the universe.
  • #1
KurtLudwig
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TL;DR Summary
Can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed from a telescope on Earth or can they only be observed by the Hubbell telescope in space?
There may be too much absorption and distortion by the atmosphere of the faint images when viewed from Earth.
 
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  • #2
It looks like radio telescopes on Earth can image them okay:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein_ring

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  • #5
Thanks for the link. I have read the article of the above link, and the observation of doctoral researcher Margharita Bettinelli.

Are radio telescopes more sensitive than optical telescopes since microwaves are less absorbed by clouds and water vapor in the air?

It must take a very high-powered reflective telescope to to see a source galaxy 8.5 billion light years from Earth. And it must be located on a mountain top in Chile where there is very little light pollution and water vapor in the atmosphere.
 
  • #6
KurtLudwig said:
It must take a very high-powered reflective telescope...
Yup, if you consider a 'gain' factor 250 000 to 1 000 000 to be 'very high-powered.'

Depending on the individual, the pupil size when dark adapted is 4mm to 8mm.
(reference: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK381/)
If you calculate the light gathering area of the human pupil and the 4meter telescope, that's the ratio you get.

Just another tool that we 'Humans-the-tool-makers' have come up with.:oldbiggrin:

Cheers,
Tom
 
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Related to Can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed from a telescope on Earth?

1. How can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed from a telescope on Earth?

Einstein-Chwolson rings, also known as gravitational lensing, can be observed from a telescope on Earth by looking for distorted or elongated images of distant galaxies. These distortions are caused by the bending of light around massive objects, such as galaxies or clusters of galaxies, due to their gravitational pull.

2. What type of telescope is needed to observe Einstein-Chwolson rings?

Any type of telescope can potentially observe Einstein-Chwolson rings, as long as it has a high enough resolution and is pointed at the right location in the sky. However, larger and more powerful telescopes, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, are better suited for observing these faint and distant phenomena.

3. Where in the sky can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed?

Einstein-Chwolson rings can be observed anywhere in the sky, as long as there are massive objects in the line of sight. However, they are more commonly observed in areas with a high concentration of galaxies, such as galaxy clusters.

4. Can Einstein-Chwolson rings be observed in visible light?

Yes, Einstein-Chwolson rings can be observed in visible light, as well as in other wavelengths such as infrared and radio. However, they may be easier to detect in longer wavelengths due to less interference from other sources of light.

5. How do scientists use Einstein-Chwolson rings to study the universe?

Scientists use Einstein-Chwolson rings to study the distribution of dark matter in the universe, as well as to measure the mass of distant galaxies and galaxy clusters. They can also use these observations to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity and to study the effects of gravity on light.

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