Can we see the latex source code for each post?

  • LaTeX
  • Thread starter yucheng
  • Start date
In summary, posts by others in PF, even your own posts after some time, cannot be edited. It would be great if we could at least copy the source code, perhaps by toggling a page where the source code of the post can be copied, but not edited?
  • #1
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I was hoping to copy whole posts, along with the LATEX code (not the rendered equations). One way I did it in the Stackexchange network is to toggle the edit page and copy the source code there.

Apparently posts by others in PF, even your own posts after some time, cannot be edited. It would be great if we could at least copy the source code, perhaps by toggling a page where the source code of the post can be copied, but not edited?

Thanks in advance! ##;))##

P.S. it appears that for every line break copied from the text in the PF post editor (press the enter key), it is multiplied by two when pasted into, for instance Geany. Why is there such a behaviour?
1663892645289.png
 
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  • #2
If you have the BB toggle set so the icons are red and you "Reply" to the post, do you see the raw LaTeX? I usually do...
 
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  • #3
Yes I just realized that haha quick work around... Thanks!
 
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  • #4
$$v(t)~=~L\frac{di(t)}{dt}$$
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
1663893278646.png
$$v(t)~=~L\frac{di(t)}{dt}$$
 
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  • #6
By the way, if you just want to copy the LaTeX for a single equation rather than an entire post, just right-click on the rendered equation and select either "Show Math As >" or "Copy to Clipboard >" as appropriate.

1663967071695.png
 
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  • #7
DrGreg said:
By the way, if you just want to copy the LaTeX for a single equation rather than an entire post, just right-click on the rendered equation and select either "Show Math As >" or "Copy to Clipboard >" as appropriate.
That's a good way, unless the ##\LaTeX## code has some “hidden” code that MathJax executes but doesn't display. ##\require{physics} \require{newcommand} \def\jjmm{{j_1 j_2; m_1 m_2}} \def\jjjm{{j_1 j_2; j m}}##

But once you see the code, you will probably be able to guess that there is some more code hidden elsewhere in the post.
$$\begin{equation}
\ip{\jjmm}{\jjjm} = (-1)^{j_1 - j_2 + m} \sqrt{2j + 1} \begin{pmatrix}
j_1 & j_2 & j \\
m_1 & m_2 & -m
\end{pmatrix}.
\end{equation}$$
 
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  • #8
Wrichik Basu said:
That's a good way, unless the ##\LaTeX## code has some “hidden” code that MathJax executes but doesn't display. ##\require{physics} \require{newcommand} \def\jjmm{{j_1 j_2; m_1 m_2}} \def\jjjm{{j_1 j_2; j m}}##

But once you see the code, you will probably be able to guess that there is some more code hidden elsewhere in the post.
$$\ip{\jjmm}{\jjjm} = ...$$
That's technically possible, but almost never used in actual posts.
 
  • #9
mfb said:
That's technically possible, but almost never used in actual posts.
Now I see the hidden code >u<
 

1. How do I access the latex source code for each post?

The latex source code for each post can be accessed by clicking on the "Edit" button located at the bottom of the post. This will open a window where you can view and edit the latex code.

2. Can I view the latex source code without editing the post?

Yes, you can view the latex source code without editing the post by clicking on the "View source" button located next to the "Edit" button. This will open a new tab with the latex code.

3. What if I want to see the latex source code for a specific equation within the post?

You can use the "View source" button located next to each equation to access the latex source code for that specific equation. This will open a new tab with the code for that particular equation.

4. Can I copy and paste the latex source code for a post?

Yes, you can copy and paste the latex source code for a post by clicking on the "View source" button and then selecting and copying the code. You can then paste it into your own document or editor.

5. Is there a way to view the latex source code for older posts?

Yes, you can view the latex source code for older posts by using the "Revision history" feature. This will show you all previous versions of the post, including the latex code for each version.

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