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Can you really touch anything

  1. Mar 20, 2013 #1
    im doing a project on this topic and its really weird and is it actually ture? can you actually touch anything!?!?!?!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 20, 2013 #2

    ZapperZ

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    We have had this question popping up over and over again. We may need to add this to our FAQ.



    Zz.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  4. Mar 20, 2013 #3

    phinds

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    Yes, please do.
     
  5. Mar 20, 2013 #4
    I always find that explanation wonky, just don't feel comfortable with statements like "The electrons on my behind repel the electrons on the chair". Anyone else feel the same.
     
  6. Mar 20, 2013 #5

    phinds

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    No, I'm not concerned about the electrons in your behind :smile:
     
  7. Mar 20, 2013 #6
    Pretty sure you know what I mean. Oh okay, watched the rest of the video, the irksome feeling went away.
     
  8. Mar 20, 2013 #7

    phinds

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    Yes, but I couldn't resist.
     
  9. Mar 20, 2013 #8
    I heard there are alot of vacancies for electrons, well the ones that work in the "behind" against chair region...

    """I always find that explanation wonky, just don't feel comfortable with statements like "The electrons on my behind repel the electrons on the chair".""""
    i might bet that the electrons feel similarly.. :D
     
  10. Mar 21, 2013 #9
    Sure, in an everyday macro setting you can say we "touch" things. But if you really want to get deep into it, what exactly is touch? Even if you could get electrons to "touch" each other, what exactly does that mean? For all we know an electron is a point particle...and what happens when you touch two point particles? Well, they'd be on top of each other. Or maybe it's a vibrating string...so then what, the strings touch?

    Either way, we have to be satisfied with the idea that touch, whether on a macro or nano scale, is just interaction of forces.

    This is just my layman's interpretation of it, please someone straighten me out if it's way off.
     
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