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Catch without to touch, vacuum pumps and sprinklers

  1. Mar 24, 2013 #1

    iii

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    I am interesting in searching several options to catch big size wafer, 1 meter X 2 meter, the wide of this wafer is very thin, only 120 micro meter, the challenge is that it is forbidden to touch the wafer because we don't want to put some finger prints or scrap the wafer, and the mission is to take the wafer from one point to another point with parallel robot that do it fast.
    I find a video in youtube that is close to what I wrote, it is not exactly because it work with arm robot and it work more slowly, this is the link:

    also I know that in the DVD the robotic arm that read the DVD can't touch the DVD because if the robotic arm that read the DVD will touch the DVD than the DVD will scrap and this will destroy the DVD so the robotic arm is very close to the DVD and don't touch the DVD and can read the DVD, I am interesting to read more information about how they solve this aerodynamic problem so I will glad to receive some links about that.
    I am interesting in information about how to do that the parallel robot will catch the wafer and move it to other point fast and without to break the wafer, I think it can do by vacuum pumps, but how to choose the right vacuum pumps, what more challenge can be hear? What others tools are needs for this mission?
    I am searching after links with information about things that are correlated to this.
    Also I am interesting after information sprinklers that can sprinkle a chemical liquid material to the wafer and it will be homogeneous for all the wafer so all the places in the wafer will receive the same quantity of the chemical liquid material.​
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2013 #2

    etudiant

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    Flatness is a key requirement for your system. The wafer is too thin to be self supporting, so it needs support all over.
    Keeping a 1mx2m wafer 120 microns thick flat enough to handle takes extraordinary machinery or a different approach. The wafer probably does not have the strength to be handled by normal vacuum chucks, so it needs to be associated with a custom carrier that holds down the wafer with a vacuum on a specially flattened bed.
    The wafer/carrier assembly can then be put through the usual process steps.
    The usual method for distributing chemicals over a wafer uniformly is to spin coat the wafer, which should also work here.
     
  4. Mar 24, 2013 #3

    iii

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    Hi etudiant, thank you for your replay.
    I don’t understand why flatness is a key requirement for the system, what can happen if the wafer will be not flat?
    Can you give more information or links for spin coat the wafer?
    What these coats give to the wafer?
    How the process of spin coat the wafer does?
    What are the tools that are necessary for spin coat the wafer?

    Hi forum member's, I will glad if you can write more replays for the main in this thread.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2013 #4

    etudiant

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    Flatness is critical for electronic circuit photolithography, the lenses have little depth of field to focus the circuit outlines.
    Also, a 1-2m**2 wafer only 120 microns thick is very frail, so if it is not evenly supported, it will warp or break. Just moving such a wafer without damage is difficult.
    Spin coating is a standard technique for depositing materials over a surface, the item to be coated is spun while the coating material is applied. This gives an even coating and any excess is lost off the edges by centrifugal force. Hard drive disks are coated this way. Note there are other numerous methods, usually vacuum deposition or sputtering or even molecular beam epitaxy, used if very exact coatings are wanted.
     
  6. Apr 3, 2013 #5

    Danger

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    In the sign shop where I used to work, we used a vacuum table for particularly "floppy" materials such as cloth or vinyl banners. It was similar to an air-hockey table (but homemade) and used a simple shop vac attached to the plenum. It would hold a piece of material (even something as flimsy as a silk scarf) firmly enough for it to be screen printed and have the screen lifted off without sticking. Maybe a portable version could be attached to your transport arm rather than individual suction cups as shown in the video. Holes of something like 1/2mm spaced 5mm or so apart should give a pretty solid flat lift. (Size and placement subject to change according to calculation or experimentation.)
    As with the vacuum surfaces of the regular screen presses, suction was restricted to the working area by masking off any unnecessary holes. The main advantages of the homemade table were a large surface area and stronger suction than the presses supplied.
     
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