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I How to lift water up to 5 metres without using a pump?

  1. Jun 1, 2016 #1
    I was asked how you can lift the water up to 5 meter but you are not allowed to use any kind of pump. What I thought; seal the container from where water is being lifted. Connect it with a pressure vessel at some height which is containing steam and water with valve in between them. By default valve is closed. Now wait for steam being cooled in the vessel that would create a vacuum inside the vessel. Then open the valve. One more thing vessel is kind of cylinder and Kind or cover is placed at top of inside the vessel which will go down during cooling of steam; so that I would be able to make vacuum that is effective as I am stopping any kind of evaporation or boiling. There is a provision of tap below vessel to drain out some water also. After all these things I ended with a reciprocating pump only.

    Please help
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 1, 2016 #2
    1) With the water in a container, use an elevator to lift the container - or a crane or just carry it.
    or
    2) Boil the water.
    or
    3) Place the container onto a land mine.
     
  4. Jun 1, 2016 #3
    Interesting :rolleyes:
     
  5. Jun 1, 2016 #4

    Nidum

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    Bucket chain .
    Bucket wheel .
    Rag pump .
    Archimedian screw .
    Balance crane .
    Camel .
    Labourer .
     
  6. Jun 1, 2016 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    Be a tree?
     
  7. Jun 1, 2016 #6
    That means capillary action :woot:
     
  8. Jun 1, 2016 #7

    davenn

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    yes and isn't a pump
     
  9. Jun 2, 2016 #8

    CWatters

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    Is "the water" flowing or static?
     
  10. Jun 2, 2016 #9

    anorlunda

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    Fun thread
    1. Evaporate it, then catch the rain.
    2. Make a still with the condenser 5 m up
    3. Blow wind over water until waves are 5 m high.
    4. Waterspout.
    5. Freeze it, then throw snowballs
    6. Cloth treadmill on an incline, wet at the bottom and a wringer on top.
    7. A birdbath. Let the birds drink, then fly up and eliminate.
    8. A funnel feeding a tube at the base of a waterfall. (5m? Who knows?)
    9. A Catapult throwing water balloons.
    10. A Rocket
    11. Use an elephant with a long trunk.
    12. Put a plastic barrel with water in front of a wall. Run into it at high speed with a car.
    Give me a day, I'll think of another dozen. I bet half the PF members can do the same .
     
  11. Jun 2, 2016 #10
    Siphon action. Use a pipe more than 8m long
     
  12. Jun 4, 2016 #11
    What is your definition of a "pump"?
     
  13. Jun 5, 2016 #12

    CWatters

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    How does that work?
     
  14. Jun 7, 2016 #13
    Add stones until the level rises to 5m!
     
  15. Jun 7, 2016 #14
    I think number 12 constitutes a most basic form of pump and should be disqualified. And half of 11 if the elephant is spraying the water instead of sucking it up.
     
  16. Jun 7, 2016 #15

    anorlunda

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    1. Did anyone mention a geyser?
    2. Or the man made version of a geyser: a percolator.
    3. Parts of Scandinavia are still recovering from the last ice age. The land is rising 1 cm/year. So in about 500 years, all the lakes will be raised 5 m.
    4. Tsunami
    5. Splash. A big (or fast) object striking the surface of water creates a splash that could be 5 m high.
    6. Laser levitation. Science experiments move particles with lasers every day via radiation pressure. How about boosting a single H20 molecule 5m by laser?
     
  17. Jun 7, 2016 #16
    Hold the water still. Move the earth 5 meters with a lever.
    Put the water in a boat, and wait for a 5 m wave, or a 5 m tide, or global warming.
    Turn the water into hydrogen and oxygen in a balloon. The buoyancy of the hydrogen will cause it to rise. Then light a match.
    .... that could also be done continuously. Electrochemically turn water into hydrogen and oxygen in a pipe. The gas pressure would cause it to expand out the top of the pipe. Where it could be burned carefully and collected.
     
  18. Jun 7, 2016 #17

    rude man

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    But less than ~ 9.8m. At sea level. At high altitudes 8m is already too long.
     
  19. Jun 7, 2016 #18

    rude man

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    ρgh = patmosphere.
     
  20. Jun 7, 2016 #19

    jbriggs444

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    If you are trying to siphon water five meters with an eight meter pipe, you will have problems. You need five meters up and then at least five meters back down. The total had better be greater than ten meters or you won't have a siphon. You'll have an empty pipe instead.
     
  21. Jun 7, 2016 #20

    rude man

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    You're still lifting water up 8m. The problem stated " ..how you can lift the water up to 5 meter ...". It didn't say you couldn't then bring it back down to below the start level.
     
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