Certain schools/teachers giving easy A's

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  • Thread starter government
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In summary: For example, if you take an AP World History class and get a grade of a B in it, that doesn't mean you won't be accepted to a good university if you have a strong SAT score. However, if you take an AP World History class and get a grade of a C in it, you're probably not going to get accepted to a good university.
  • #1
government
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My friend goes to a more ghetto school than me and his teachers in AP classes practically hand out A's. Right now he has a 115% in AP world history from all the easy homework quizzes with trivial questions like"what year did X battle take place" and extra credit.Homework is assigned like every 2-3 days whereas at my school we have homework every night, multiple essays per week, and hard as f*ck tests that you can't pass by just memorizing dates and names of leaders. Most people in my class have a B or a low A and work hard to get those grades while my friend has a 115% and barely has to do anything.

Not complaining about my class at all its what I would expect from any AP subject, but it kind of pisses me off that people at other schools get super high grades from barely working at all. He isn't that smart either, we are both in 11th grade and he is in normal level precalculus while most of the people who are at my school are taking AP calc ab/bc or Multivariable.

The reason why I am telling you guys this is because I want to know if colleges make any effort to distinguish an A in one school from an A in another. I don't want someone to get accepted into a college instead of me just because their teacher decided hand out easy A's.
 
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  • #2
grades aren't everything

when you have a much higher SAT, it will show that you're more prepared for uni
 
  • #3
Colleges are pretty aware of grade inflation. This is why they look at things such as the SAT tests. Though they know it exists, it's probably very hard to say school X inflates grades twice as badly as school Y.

And if it makes oyu feel any better, people who go to crumby high schools that aren't challenged won't be able to make it at a high powered university.
 
  • #4
Only some schools care. There are some colleges that look strictly at GPA + SAT and that is it, end of story. You'll have to figure out which schools will actually look at the courses you took, give some weight to recommendations, extracurriculars, class rank, etc. Fortunately, those schools are easier to find than the former type. It's a screwed up system, so you'll have to work your tail off to get everything as high as possible, but if you ask me, it's not really worth it (unless your life plans include working as an investment banker out of undergrad or something equally as crazy).
 
  • #5
hadsed said:
Only some schools care. There are some colleges that look strictly at GPA + SAT and that is it, end of story. You'll have to figure out which schools will actually look at the courses you took, give some weight to recommendations, extracurriculars, class rank, etc. Fortunately, those schools are easier to find than the former type. It's a screwed up system, so you'll have to work your tail off to get everything as high as possible, but if you ask me, it's not really worth it (unless your life plans include working as an investment banker out of undergrad or something equally as crazy).

It's not worth getting into a good university?
 
  • #6
I wouldn't say 'good' university, I'd limit it to those upper tier schools that everyone seems to stress over. But also it depends on your career goals.
 
  • #7
government said:
The reason why I am telling you guys this is because I want to know if colleges make any effort to distinguish an A in one school from an A in another. I don't want someone to get accepted into a college instead of me just because their teacher decided hand out easy A's.

Yes people know about difference in grading policy and they try to correct for this. One way that they do it is to not sweat small details. The difference between an B and a A may be due to differences in grading. The difference between a D and a A is probably not.

As far as AP classes go, people are going to be a lot more interested in the score that they make in the AP test itself than on the grade they got in the class. Also what classes that you take matters a bit more than what you get in them.
 

Related to Certain schools/teachers giving easy A's

1. Why do some schools/teachers give easy A's?

There can be a variety of reasons for this. Some teachers may have a more lenient grading style, or the school may have a culture of awarding high grades. In other cases, teachers may feel pressure to give high grades in order to maintain their job or receive positive feedback from students and parents.

2. Is giving easy A's beneficial for students?

It depends on the individual student and their goals. While receiving an easy A may boost a student's GPA, it may also lead to a false sense of achievement and hinder their learning in the long run. Additionally, if the student encounters more challenging courses in the future, they may struggle due to not having developed the necessary skills and work ethic.

3. How do easy A's affect the overall academic standards of a school?

Easy A's can lower the academic standards of a school by devaluing the meaning and significance of earning an A. It can also create an uneven playing field for students who work hard for their grades, making it difficult for them to stand out among their peers.

4. What steps can be taken to prevent easy A's from being given?

Schools and teachers can establish clear and consistent grading criteria and expectations. They can also regularly review and adjust their grading practices to ensure fairness and maintain academic standards. Additionally, students can be encouraged to focus on learning and understanding the material rather than just earning a high grade.

5. Are there any potential consequences for schools/teachers who give easy A's?

In some cases, giving easy A's can lead to a decrease in credibility for the school and its academic programs. It can also result in students feeling unprepared for higher education or the workforce. In extreme cases, schools and teachers may face consequences such as losing accreditation or facing legal action from disgruntled students or parents.

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