Cetripetal and Centrifugal forces: points of action

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between centripetal and centrifugal forces and whether they act on the same body or on different bodies. It is determined that centripetal force acts on the body being rotated, while centrifugal force is the reaction force experienced by the hand or fixed end of the string. In the case of a whirling bucket, centrifugal force is the force that keeps the water in the bucket and prevents it from spilling out.
  • #1
abhineetK
18
0
1. Do centripetal and centrifugal act on same body or on different bodies??
I am told that if a stone tied to one end of the string is revolved around its another end(fixed), centripetal force acts on stone and centrifugal force acts on the fixed end of the string.

The Attempt at a Solution



I say both forces act on same body, centripetal provided by some another force and centrifugal due its own inertia.
Which statement is true?? mine or the first one??
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Does anybody have any idea about this??
please help...
 
  • #3
Please help...
 
  • #4
Why in the world would you think this is a mathematics question? I am moving it to the physics homework section.
 
  • #5
abhineetK said:
1. Do centripetal and centrifugal act on same body or on different bodies??
I am told that if a stone tied to one end of the string is revolved around its another end(fixed), centripetal force acts on stone and centrifugal force acts on the fixed end of the string.




The Attempt at a Solution



I say both forces act on same body, centripetal provided by some another force and centrifugal due its own inertia.
Which statement is true?? mine or the first one??
The first one. If you swing a stone one a string, centripetal force is the force, exerted by the string on the stone, that pulls it off a straight line. Centrifugal force is the name given to the feeling of a "fictitious" force your hand feels in exerting that centripetal force on the string.
 
  • #6
abhineetK said:
1. Do centripetal and centrifugal act on same body or on different bodies??
I am told that if a stone tied to one end of the string is revolved around its another end(fixed), centripetal force acts on stone and centrifugal force acts on the fixed end of the string.




The Attempt at a Solution



I say both forces act on same body, centripetal provided by some another force and centrifugal due its own inertia.
Which statement is true?? mine or the first one??
Always forces appear in pairs. And they won't act on the same body.
In the example of whirling stone, centripetal force, which acts towards the center, keeps the stone in the circular orbit by preventing it by going in a straight line path. Reaction to this force is experienced by the hand. It is away from the center. If you want you call it as centrifugal reaction. It is a real force. In this case there is no centrifugal force. Now, instead of whirling stone, consider a whirling bucket with some water in it. If the velocity of rotation is proper, the water does not spill out of the bucket even in the vertical circular motion. The force which keeps the water in the bucket is called centrifugal force. Water tries to move in a straight line path. But the bucket prevents it from doing so. When the bucket stops in the middle of the path, water spills out of the bucket. The force appears in the accelerated frame of reference.
 
  • #7
OKAY- got it
Thank you
 

Related to Cetripetal and Centrifugal forces: points of action

1. What is the difference between centripetal and centrifugal forces?

Centripetal and centrifugal forces are both types of inertial forces that act on an object in circular motion. Centripetal force is directed towards the center of the circle and is responsible for keeping the object moving in a circular path. Centrifugal force, on the other hand, is directed away from the center of the circle and is a result of the object's inertia trying to continue moving in a straight line.

2. How do centripetal and centrifugal forces relate to Newton's laws of motion?

Centripetal and centrifugal forces are both a result of Newton's first law of motion, also known as the law of inertia. This law states that an object in motion will continue moving in a straight line at a constant speed unless acted upon by an external force. In circular motion, these forces act as the external force to keep the object moving in a curved path.

3. Can you provide examples of centripetal and centrifugal forces in real life?

Centripetal and centrifugal forces can be observed in many everyday situations. An example of centripetal force is when a car turns a corner, the friction between the tires and the road provides the centripetal force to keep the car on its curved path. An example of centrifugal force is when a spinning amusement park ride causes riders to feel pushed outward due to their inertia.

4. How do the points of action for centripetal and centrifugal forces differ?

The point of action for centripetal force is always towards the center of the circle, while the point of action for centrifugal force is away from the center. This means that centripetal force acts on the object being moved in a circular path, while centrifugal force acts on the object causing the circular motion.

5. How do centripetal and centrifugal forces affect the stability of an object?

Centripetal forces keep an object moving in a stable circular path, while centrifugal forces can cause the object to become unstable or move away from its intended path. This is why it is important for engineers and designers to consider these forces when creating structures or objects that will be in motion.

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