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Childhood memories not what they used to be

  1. Oct 27, 2011 #1

    Evo

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    There is a cookie commercial by Nestle for chocolate chip cookies out right now that talks about creating memories for your children of cooking together.

    They show a child pulling squares of finished cookie dough off of a waxed piece of cardboard from a packet and placing them on a cookie sheet, which the mom lovingly places in the oven.

    WHAT??? What happened to actually MAKING cookie dough? The fond memories of licking the spoon and bowl? Learning a skill, accomplishing something?

    Will the next generation's fond memories be of tossing a frozen dinner into a microwave? "No one could press "start" like my mom".

    Of course THIS is what happens when children don't learn how to cook, they wash roasting chickens with soap. :eek:

    http://www.bravotv.com/the-real-housewives-of-beverly-hills/season-2/videos/soap-on-a-chicken
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 27, 2011 #2
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  4. Oct 27, 2011 #3

    Astronuc

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    My son baked a birthday cake for me. Even did the icing - but from a can. And he can make a nice apple crisp. :approve:

    It ain't like the old days when I sifted flour for my mom and grandma, and made pies and pasties from scratch, or roasted chicken with stuffing, or preserves, or cookies and pastries from scratch. My maternal grandparents used a wood stove, since they lived in the country and natural gas wasn't yet available in their area. I used to chop wood and fire up the stove. Hot baths were made hot with boiling water from the stove!

    We had to use an outhouse.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  5. Oct 27, 2011 #4

    Evo

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    Ok, so some modern conveniences are good things. :uhh:
     
  6. Oct 27, 2011 #5
    Yeah, I remember my older sisters making fudge, and tollhouse (chocolate chip) cookies, and chocolate cake with this incredible frosting, etc. I didn't actually learn how to do that stuff, but I did like to lick the utensils.

    Those were the good old days, eh? Hopefully, our electrical grids and processed food industries won't suddenly cease functioning, because if they do we're in deep trouble.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  7. Oct 27, 2011 #6

    lisab

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    How about popcorn cooked on the stove? I remember *lots* of burned bits and old maids :tongue2: but lots of salty, greasy goodness too.
     
  8. Oct 27, 2011 #7

    Astronuc

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    Entertainment was the radio and BBC, otherwise we sat in the living room talking. Otherwise, we were outside in the bush, or spending time at the railway station where my grandfather worked, or wandering about the railroad yard.

    We did have pet chickens, too.
     
  9. Oct 27, 2011 #8

    Evo

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    My mom was a popcorn expert, I don't know how she did it, never burned, almost all kernals popped. Then the kid next door used some weird contraption called "jiffy pop", usually caught on fire. I swore to never get near the thing.

    My mom made yeast donuts from scratch at least twice a month. I am not the cook my mom was, no matter how hard I try, the woman was a perfectionist and she delivered. I've always felt like a cooking failure, she was magic. Except at steak, she would cook a steak for 45 minutes, it was like a shoe sole, you couldn't eat it. She loved it that way. It would make my jaw hurt.

    I'll never forget the first time we went to france and visited her family. Her sister cooked steak. She threw them into a hot pan and immediately turned them then served them. The parts of the steak that didn't lie flat were still red and raw on the outside. These were six second steaks. I just looked at it, not knowing what to do, I'd never eaten raw meat. My mom took ours and asked her sister if she minded if she cooked them. I like rare meat now, but my aunt's would qualify as carpaccio.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2011
  10. Oct 27, 2011 #9

    rhody

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    I still do it that way Lisa, old school, gas stove, large covered pot, popcorn, oil, salt, margarine till it melts and boils away. If I use just the right amounts, it comes out awesome, not to dry or too greasy. No one makes it as good in my house. Maybe I should try ghost bits :eek: in it too, nah... I will skip that part.

    Rhody... :smile:
     
  11. Oct 28, 2011 #10
    You mean before we learned that eating raw eggs wasn't the smartest thing to do?

    A lot of us grew up with toll house cookies. A couple of weeks ago my Mom made some ranger cookies (similar, but with oats and raisins) and without thinking, I started licking the bowl and spoon. She turned to me and said, "Dan! Don't do that!"

    We both realized she'd said the same thing 45 years ago, and had a good laugh!

    I'm surprised there aren't premade, pre-cut sheets of cookie circles that can simply be slid out of a box and onto the rack. Sounds like they're close.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 28, 2011
  12. Oct 28, 2011 #11
    I remember going to the grocery store with my grandmother as a kid - she was talking about making some sort of pie, and a lady that was kind of following us through the store overheard and asked "Ohhh... how do you make that, it sounds delicious!" My grandmother replied "oh, I make it from scratch". The lady, confused, "where do you buy scratch at?"
     
  13. Oct 28, 2011 #12

    Evo

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    You cook the dough. The processed dough squares contain raw egg.

    It is extremely rare to get salmonella from raw eggs.

    http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/egg-safety/eggs-and-food-safety [Broken][/B]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  14. Oct 28, 2011 #13

    wolram

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    :rofl:
     
  15. Oct 28, 2011 #14
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7s664NsLeFM
     
  16. Oct 28, 2011 #15
    Old joke alert.

    The chef on the cooking show tells the audience be sure to cut off the ends of the ham before putting it in the pan to bake. Someone asks why and the chef stops for a moment. Because my mother always did it, that's why. But why did your mother do it? I don't know, I'll call her tonight and ask her. Mom says because I had a small baking pan.
     
  17. Oct 28, 2011 #16

    Borek

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    I know someone who tried to wash ground meat before using it. You DO wash meat before using it, don't you?
     
  18. Oct 28, 2011 #17
    Where is the drooling emoticon?
     
  19. Oct 28, 2011 #18
    My wife still makes popcorn on the stove when it is for the whole family. (We have bad wiring in our house and pop the breaker at night if we run the microwave and any lights are on downstairs... it is a very old house.) She even has a specific pot she uses - it is only used for popcorn. There is usually only a few unpoped kernels left. It is a smaller pot, so maybe that is part of the trick?

    And I really don't think the average person just buys the cookie dough pre-made. It is really not all that much work to make chocolate chip cookies... maybe I am wrong.

    Basically, the only thing we don't do from scratch is pie dough. Neither my wife nor I have had any luck with it. So we go the easy route with the frozen store version.

    Now I am all hungry for pie and cookies...
     
  20. Oct 28, 2011 #19

    turbo

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    When I was in the Boy Scouts, I was the assistant leader of my patrol pretty quick. The reason was that I could cook. The patrol leader was several years older than me, and the first time we went on a camporee, the adults came around to our campfire to mooch off us. They said they just wanted to see how well we could cook, but they all took big helpings. We got the same ingredients as every other patrol, but Gary (eldest son of a dairy-farmer) and I knew how to cook. The scoutmaster should have awarded me my cooking merit badge on the spot. I got it a couple of weeks later, after cooking supper for an older neighbor.

    I made a fire-ring out of rocks on the grounds of the scout-hall, built a wood fire, burned it down to coals, and cooked and served the entire supper out there. We sat on logs out in the yard and ate our supper. There were NO left-overs, just some dirty dishes to lug home.

    I wonder how many kids today could plan a meal, pull together all the utensils and ingredients, and cook a good meal outdoors? And I don't mean Hamburger Helper.
     
  21. Oct 28, 2011 #20

    turbo

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    :tongue2:
     
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