Collisional Astrophysics Models for Computer Scientists

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In summary, the conversation discusses the topic of collisional astrophysics models. The person speaking is a computer scientist looking for help in developing algorithms for systems with collisions. They have already created an algorithm for systems without collisions and are curious if it is worth trying to expand into the world of collisions. The other person mentions that collisions are typically dealt with using simple approximations, such as the "sticky star" model, and that full collisions are only done in full hydrodynamics calculations. They also suggest looking into Gadget as an industry standard. The conversation concludes with the person thanking the other for their reply and realizing that collisional models may not be worth the effort as they are simply extensions of existing models.
  • #1
carltropper
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I would like find references to collisional astrophysics models. I am a computer scientist interested in developing discrete event n body algorithms and would like any help that I can get. I have developed a direct n body algorithm for systems without collisions which seems to work well and would like to find out if it makes sense to try my hand at the world of collisions.
 
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What type of collisions are you hoping to do?
Generally, even in few-body simulations, collisions are dealt with using some (incredibly) simple prescription, e.g. the "sticky star" approximation in which stars simply merge, and conservation of mass, momentum, and energy is enforced. In stellar evolution models, systems which collide are often just removed from the simulation.

Full collisions are generally only done in full hydrodynamics calculations.

You might want to take a look at Gadget (an industry standard).
 
  • #3
Thank you very much for your reply. I guess this means that collisional models are not really worthwhile expending much energy on as they are simple extensions of collision type models.
 

Related to Collisional Astrophysics Models for Computer Scientists

1. What is collisional astrophysics?

Collisional astrophysics is a field of study that focuses on the physical processes that occur when two or more astronomical objects collide or interact with each other. This can include collisions between stars, planets, galaxies, and other celestial bodies.

2. How do computer scientists contribute to collisional astrophysics?

Computer scientists play a crucial role in collisional astrophysics by developing and using computer models to simulate and study these collisions. These models can provide insights into the behavior and dynamics of astronomical objects, and can also help test and refine existing theories and hypotheses.

3. What are some common techniques used in collisional astrophysics models?

Some common techniques used in collisional astrophysics models include N-body simulations, hydrodynamic simulations, and Monte Carlo methods. These techniques allow scientists to model the interactions and dynamics of astronomical objects, and can provide valuable insights into the processes at work during collisions.

4. What types of collisions are studied in collisional astrophysics?

Collisional astrophysics covers a wide range of collisions between different types of astronomical objects. These can include collisions between stars, planets, black holes, and even galaxies. Each type of collision presents its own unique set of challenges and can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of the universe.

5. How can collisional astrophysics models be applied in other fields?

Collisional astrophysics models can have applications in a variety of fields, including planetary science, cosmology, and even engineering. The insights gained from studying collisions in space can provide a better understanding of how our solar system and universe formed, and can also inform the design of spacecraft and other technology used in space exploration.

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