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Comet Lovejoy finder charts

  1. Jan 13, 2015 #1

    davenn

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    Comet Lovejoy is well placed in the sky for the next week or so.... it has just gone past peak magnitude of M4.2 around 4 days ago ( 9th Jan). But it is still a bright and easy object particularly with binoculars
    Visually ( from a dark site) or in binoculars, its a bright fuzzy blob ... sort of similar looking to a globular cluster ..... It takes a good telescope or a photo to pick the blue/green colour.

    As of today 14 Jan it is passing through Taurus

    Here's a couple of finder charts with appropriate orientations for the northern hemisphere .....

    Lovejoy NthrnHemis1.jpg



    and the southern hemisphere ....

    Lovejoy SthrnHemis1.jpg


    cheers
    Dave
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 14, 2015 #2

    Bystander

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    I give up. Anything known or suspected causing the color?
     
  4. Jan 14, 2015 #3

    davenn

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    yup

    actually its not an uncommon colour in comets

    "The green color is due to two gases emanating from the comet: cyanogen and diatomic carbon, which both fluoresce green when UV sunlight strikes them"

    so I'm told ;)

    Finally a clear nite here after 5 nites of cloud, have the car packed with telescope and camera gear and am heading out to a dark site
    hopefully get some reasonable pix


    cheers
    Dave
     
  5. Jan 14, 2015 #4

    Bystander

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    They'll drum me out of the ACS for this. Cross your fingers the weather breaks for my neck of the woods. I haven't seen sun, moon, stars for close to two weeks.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2015 #5

    davenn

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    :( not good mate

    OK just got home from a trip to a dark site
    here's a quick pic before I go to bed it's after midnite .... no processing other than cropping and resizing for the forum
    400mm, f6.3, 30 sec @ 1600 ISO

    2015_01_14_2779a.jpg

    cheers
    Dave
     
  7. Jan 14, 2015 #6

    DaveC426913

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    I want to go out in the next couple of nights to see it, and I might send some less experienced friends out to look, so I've made some maps that I think will help them find it better than than pro maps davenn provided.

    It's passing south of the Pleiades, which shouldn't be hard to locate, but it's dim enough at 5.0 and dropping that I've included a zoomed in version of the most proximal stars as a star-hopping aid.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Jan 14, 2015 #7

    davenn

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    Hi Dave

    It was in its correct location as indicated for the 14th ( I'm in Australia) It was easily naked eye visible from the dark site I was at

    so if you get clear skies go for it !! :)

    cheers
    Dave
     
  9. Jan 14, 2015 #8

    DaveC426913

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    A mag 5.0 object would be at the limit of my my half-century-old eyes.

    But I have my 6" scope at a friend's farm, so I will see if I can make my way up there this weekend.
     
  10. Jan 14, 2015 #9

    davenn

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    LOL I know the feeling ... I'm 55, but my main problem is double visioning ... prismed lenses in my glasses help a lot
    the worse thing is I cannot focus really close up and trying to make sure objects are in focus through the camera is extremely difficult :(

    seeing how bright it was last nite I would estimate it to be M 4.5 - 5.0. Haven't seen any official figures as yet

    the 6" scope will give you a great view .... it was huge in 7x50 bino's last nite

    D
     
  11. Jan 15, 2015 #10

    davenn

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    so Dave,
    did you get a chance to see it ? hope so

    OK, that pic above was a single 30 sec exposure
    This one is a combination 7 x 30 sec exposures, I use a program called DSS .... Deep Sky Stacker
    It takes all your individual images, aligns the stars within them and produces rendition that can then be worked on in photoshop etc

    lovejoy1a 1200x784b.jpg

    cheers
    Dave
     
  12. Jan 15, 2015 #11

    DaveC426913

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    I went out for a constitutional* down by the lake last night, but wouldn't you know it, a bank of high clouds rolled by just as I got to a good observing site.

    I'll try again tonight, but holy snarpin' arses it's cold out there.

    *cigar
     
  13. Jan 15, 2015 #12

    davenn

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    ok on the cold
    tis really hot down in this part of the world

    good luck for tonite's viewing :)
     
  14. Jan 15, 2015 #13

    DaveC426913

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    :( Full overcast.
     
  15. Jan 16, 2015 #14

    davenn

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    crap :(

    only thing in your advantage is that its climbing higher into the sky

    for me its heading towards the NW horizon Im looking at going out tonite again, even tho I have to be up early in the morning
    Its going to be about the last chance to get to see and photo it before our weather craps out over the next few days

    Dave
     
  16. Jan 17, 2015 #15

    Garth

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    Thank you for your finder chart.

    I saw it last night with binoculars, it was just a blob. I possibly saw the tail but nothing like Comet Lovejoy's Tail . (APOD 17.01.15)

    Garth
     
  17. Jan 18, 2015 #16

    davenn

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    Hi there Garth
    Well done !! :)

    I went out again on Friday nite. Still a very easy naked eye object around Mag 4.5. Huge blob in the bino's couldn't see any tail visually
    That only came out in the photos

    its takes serious photography and post processing to produce a tail looking like the one in your link :)

    cheers
    Dave
     
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