Comparative analysis of historical events (1600-1900)

In summary, the conversation discussed the need for a detailed comparative analysis of specific historical events from the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s over 25-year intervals. The participants also mentioned a possible volume titled "The Encyclopedia of Man/Mankind" or "The Encyclopedia of Knowledge" which offers a linear history of events from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. They also discussed the place and time frame for such a study, with one participant noting their previous reading of biased papers on the evolution of historical facts but never taking the time to compare history texts on the same events.
  • #1
WhoWee
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I would like to see a detailed comparative analysis of specific historical events from the 1600"s, 1700's, and 1800's over 25 year intervals. Does anyone know of such a study?
 
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  • #2


WhoWee said:
I would like to see a detailed comparative analysis of specific historical events from the 1600"s, 1700's, and 1800's over 25 year intervals. Does anyone know of such a study?
European, Asia, US, West Hemisphere, World?
 
  • #3


WhoWee said:
I would like to see a detailed comparative analysis of specific historical events from the 1600"s, 1700's, and 1800's over 25 year intervals. Does anyone know of such a study?
Comparative analysis of what?
 
  • #4
There is a volume that may have what one describes with some sort of linear history of events over the last 3 millenia or so, with more detail in the 6 or 8 centuries, and has parallel lines from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. I have copies of pages stored somewhere. The title is something like "The Encyclopedia of Man" (or Mankind) or the Encyclopedia of Knowledge.

It was published in England.
 
  • #5


Evo said:
Comparative analysis of what?

I've read a few (rather biased) papers regarding the "evolution" of historical facts. However, I've never taken the time to gather history texts regarding the same events together to make a comparison.

To respond to Astronuc, I don't think the place matters as much as the time frame. The original discussion was US History (in the other thread regarding schoolbooks).
 

1. What is comparative analysis of historical events?

Comparative analysis of historical events is a method of studying and understanding the past by comparing and contrasting different events that occurred during a specific time period, such as 1600-1900. It involves examining similarities and differences in various aspects, such as causes, effects, and outcomes, in order to gain a deeper understanding of historical events and their significance.

2. Why is comparative analysis important in studying history?

Comparative analysis allows us to see patterns and connections between historical events that may not be apparent when studying them individually. It also helps us to understand the context and factors that influenced these events, and how they relate to each other. This can provide a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of history.

3. How is comparative analysis conducted?

Comparative analysis can be conducted through various methods, such as examining primary sources, secondary sources, and historical data. It involves carefully selecting and analyzing relevant information from these sources, and then making comparisons and drawing conclusions based on the similarities and differences found.

4. What are the benefits of using comparative analysis in historical research?

Comparative analysis allows researchers to gain a deeper understanding of historical events and their significance, as well as the broader context in which they occurred. It also helps to identify patterns and trends, and can provide insights into human behavior and societal changes over time.

5. What are some challenges of conducting comparative analysis in history?

One of the main challenges of comparative analysis in history is the availability and reliability of sources. It can also be difficult to find appropriate events or periods to compare, and there may be limitations in the data or information that is available. Additionally, the interpretation of data and making accurate comparisons can be subjective and influenced by personal biases.

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