Compare Water Content of Muscle, Liver, Fat, Heart, Cartilage, Bone Marrow

In summary, the water content of different tissues such as muscle, liver, fat, heart, cartilage, and bone marrow can be measured in various ways, including percent by weight, water potential, and relative water content. However, there is no standard value for water content and it may vary depending on the method used. If you are trying to understand why spin-spin relaxation T2 increases in that order, you will need to measure the water content of the tissues yourself. This is because the way tissues are handled can affect the moisture content. Spin-spin T2 can be used to measure moisture content and you can refer to the provided link for more information.
  • #1
restfull
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How would you rate the following in terms of water content:

muscle, liver, fat, heart, cartilage, bone marrow

and where could i find a table of comparison...?
 
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  • #2
Water content is usually described in terms, depending on what source you're looking at, as percent by weight of free water, bound water (sometimes called water of hydration), or as fresh weight minus dry weight (Relative Water Content). Sometimes it expressed in terms of water potential - rate of water exchange between the medium and sample.
This list goes on...

The ways this is measured are many, and the results vary a lot. To my knowledge there is no "standard" value.

What exactly are you trying to do?
 
  • #3
i'm trying to find out why the spin spin relaxation T2 increases for the tissues in that order
 

1. What is the purpose of comparing the water content of different tissues?

The purpose of comparing the water content of different tissues is to better understand the composition and function of these tissues. By determining the differences in water content, we can gain insight into the role of water in maintaining the structure and function of various tissues in the body.

2. How does the water content of muscle compare to that of other tissues?

Muscle tissue has a higher water content compared to other tissues, typically ranging from 75-80%. This is due to the high water content in muscle cells, which is necessary for proper muscle function and contraction.

3. Does the water content of liver, fat, heart, cartilage, and bone marrow differ significantly?

Yes, the water content of these tissues varies significantly. The liver has a water content of around 70%, while fat has a much lower water content of about 10-15%. The heart and cartilage have a water content of about 70%, while bone marrow has a higher water content of 70-75%.

4. How does the water content of these tissues affect their function?

The water content of these tissues plays a crucial role in their function. For example, the high water content in muscle tissue allows for proper muscle contraction, while the low water content in fat tissue contributes to its role in insulation and energy storage. The water content in tissues also helps maintain their structure and supports various metabolic processes.

5. Are there any factors that can affect the water content of these tissues?

Yes, several factors can affect the water content of these tissues, including age, hydration status, and certain medical conditions. For example, dehydration can lead to a decrease in water content in tissues, while conditions like edema can result in an increase in water content. Additionally, the water content of tissues can also be influenced by the type of tissue and its function in the body.

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