Condensation-Expansion Turbines

  • Thread starter Sat D
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Summary
I want to understand how work is extracted from turbines
I am working on a project involving a steam expansion-condensation turbine. I am the only one in on the project and I am unsure of how to start. I am trained in chemical engineering and have a black box understanding of what turbines do, but have no clue about the actual design or mechanism behind the scenes. Does anybody have any suggestions on where I can read up on turbine mechanisms, and this is probably a stretch, coupled with condensation to extract as much work done as possible?
 

russ_watters

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Summary: I want to understand how work is extracted from turbines

I am working on a project involving a steam expansion-condensation turbine. I am the only one in on the project and I am unsure of how to start. I am trained in chemical engineering and have a black box understanding of what turbines do, but have no clue about the actual design or mechanism behind the scenes. Does anybody have any suggestions on where I can read up on turbine mechanisms, and this is probably a stretch, coupled with condensation to extract as much work done as possible?
As broad as the question is, I'd have to recommend perusing wikipedia and/or a thermodynamics textbook.

...I get the vague idea though that your main question is about why condensation is important. It's important because most of the stored energy is in the form of latent heat of vaporization/condensation. Look at a Rankine cycle and the steam enthalpies at the different states.
 
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Get a copy of Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics by Moran et al.
 

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