Conservation of Energy cannonball

In summary: No, the angle doesn't matter.What does the angle have to do with anything?Well, when you solve for h you're finding the height at which the balls reach their maximum height. At an angle of 42 degrees, the first ball will reach a height of 2.20 m, while the second ball will reach a height of 3.60 m.In summary, The first ball will reach a height of 2.20 m while the second ball will reach a height of 3.60 m.
  • #1
jmwachtel
35
0

Homework Statement



A 20.0 kg cannonball is fired from a cannon with a muzzle speed of 1050 m/s at an angle of 42.0° with the horizontal. A second ball is fired at an angle of 90.0°.

(a) Use the isolated system model to find the maximum height reached by each ball.

(b) What is the total mechanical energy of the ball-Earth system at the maximum height for each ball? Let y = 0 at the cannon.

Homework Equations



Ei = Ef

K = (1/2)mv^2

U = mgy

The Attempt at a Solution



I know that you can solve for h by setting these two equal, but I don't understand why that works. I need to understand how these relate. I have no idea what to do for b. Thank You.
 
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  • #2
The total mechanical energy of the ball at any point is going to be its kinetic energy + potential energy, and we're going to say the ground has gravitational potential energy of 0

So when either ball is first fired it's at a height of 0, so they have 0 initial potential energy, all they have is kinetic.

At their maximum height their velocities are 0, so they have no kinetic energy, instead all they have is potential. Because of conservation of energy(and because we're ignoring air resistance and all that), ALL that initial kinetic energy was converted to potential, and though the problem doesn't deal with it, the ball is going to fall and all that potential energy is going to get turned back into kinetic, and the total amount never changes

Also keep in mind for the first ball that it's fired at an angle, and you're only concerned with height in this problem, so you need to find the velocity in the vertical direction
 
  • #3
How do you find velocity in the vertical direction?
 
  • #4
I see on the 2nd ball that is fired the potential energy is 1.10e7 which is just mgy. How is the 1st ball calculated? I guess that's where I am having the most problem with that angle. Is it still just mgy?
 
  • #5
average velocity:
LaTeX graphic is being generated. Reload this page in a moment.
 
  • #6
jmwachtel said:
I see on the 2nd ball that is fired the potential energy is 1.10e7 which is just mgy. How is the 1st ball calculated? I guess that's where I am having the most problem with that angle. Is it still just mgy?

yes your on the right tracks
 
  • #7
I see on the 2nd ball that is fired the potential energy is 1.10e7 which is just mgy. How is the 1st ball calculated?

So for the 90 degree ball you just took its initial velocity(which was all vertical since it was at 90 degrees) and found the initial kinetic energy, and knew that was how much potential energy it'd have at the peak

For the other ball you do the exact same thing, but it'll have a different initial velocity in the y direction. You're on an energy unit so you've done projectile motion, which means you've found initial vertical(and horizontal though you don't need it here)velocities given initial velocity and an angle about 44594895709 times. Don't overthink it
 
  • #8
Ok, so I would use mg (Vsin(42))?
 
  • #9
Is this correct?
 
  • #10
Why would you want m*g*Vyi?
 
  • #11
so I should be looking for mg*Vyxi?
 
  • #12
Well what good is mgVanything to you? That's almost your equation for potential energy

You CAN use that velocity to find initial kinetic energy though. Then you can use potential energy to find distance
 
  • #13
Well I am looking for the potential energy of the 1st ball on part b which has the 42 degree angle. All of the energy is still potential right?
 
  • #14
I'm still lost?
 
  • #15
All of the energy is still potential right?

Well eventually, but initially all it has is kinetic
 
  • #16
Ok, then what do I need to solve the problem? Does the angle matter?
 

Related to Conservation of Energy cannonball

1. What is the conservation of energy?

The conservation of energy is a fundamental law in physics that states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or transformed from one form to another.

2. How does the conservation of energy apply to a cannonball?

In the case of a cannonball, the law of conservation of energy means that the initial energy of the cannonball, which is potential energy due to its elevated position, is converted into kinetic energy as it is fired from the cannon. The total amount of energy remains constant throughout the process.

3. What factors affect the conservation of energy in a cannonball?

The conservation of energy in a cannonball is affected by the mass and velocity of the cannonball, as well as the height and angle from which it is fired. The force of gravity and air resistance also play a role in the energy conservation of a cannonball.

4. Can the conservation of energy be violated in a cannonball's trajectory?

No, the conservation of energy cannot be violated in a cannonball's trajectory. As the cannonball moves through the air, it may experience decreases in kinetic energy due to air resistance, but this energy is converted into other forms such as heat and sound. The total energy of the system remains constant.

5. How does the conservation of energy in a cannonball relate to other laws of physics?

The conservation of energy is one of the fundamental laws of physics and is closely related to other laws such as Newton's laws of motion and the law of universal gravitation. These laws work together to explain the motion and behavior of objects, including cannonballs, in the physical world.

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