[cryptography] quantum key distribution

As for a comparison, there is more information available online for BB84 compared to B92 and the EPR Protocol.
  • #1
martman
1
0
I'm reading up on quantum key distribution schemes, mostly: BB84, B92 and the EPR Protocol, and I'm having some problems relating them.

Is it correct to say that BB84 is a special case of B92(with extra specific states)? Is it also safe to say that both BB84 and B92 are special cases of EPR Protocol(with its entanglement being the most flexible possible)?

Anyone happen to know of a nice comparison? Theres a nice selection online for BB84, not much for B92 or the EPR Protocol unfortunately.

Thanks
 
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  • #2
in advance!Yes, it is correct to say that BB84 is a special case of B92, since B92 is a more general version of BB84. However, it is not necessarily safe to say that both BB84 and B92 are special cases of the EPR Protocol, since the EPR Protocol is a different type of quantum key distribution protocol. The EPR Protocol uses entangled states whereas BB84 and B92 use non-entangled states. So while the EPR Protocol may be more flexible, it is not necessarily a special case of BB84 or B92.
 
  • #3


I am familiar with cryptography and quantum key distribution schemes. BB84, B92, and the EPR Protocol are all important protocols used in quantum key distribution. To answer your questions, BB84 and B92 are not necessarily special cases of the EPR Protocol, but they do have similarities. The EPR Protocol is a more general protocol that can be applied to various quantum systems, while BB84 and B92 are specific protocols with their own set of rules and states.

It is not accurate to say that BB84 is a special case of B92, as they use different states and methods for encoding and decoding information. However, there are some similarities between the two, such as the use of single photons and polarized states.

In terms of safety, all three protocols offer a high level of security for quantum key distribution. However, the EPR Protocol has the advantage of being more flexible and adaptable to different quantum systems.

As for a comparison, there is not a lot of information available online for B92 and the EPR Protocol. I would recommend consulting scientific papers and publications for a more in-depth comparison of these protocols.

I hope this helps clarify your understanding of these quantum key distribution schemes. it is important to continue researching and learning about these protocols as they play a crucial role in securing information in the digital age.
 

Related to [cryptography] quantum key distribution

1. What is quantum key distribution?

Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a method of securely sending cryptographic keys over a communication channel by utilizing the principles of quantum mechanics. It enables two parties to generate and share secret keys that are indecipherable to any eavesdropper.

2. How does quantum key distribution work?

In QKD, the two parties, typically referred to as Alice and Bob, use a quantum channel to exchange a series of qubits (quantum bits) that represent the secret key. The qubits are encoded with random polarizations, and any attempt to intercept or measure them would result in a change in their state, alerting Alice and Bob to the presence of an eavesdropper.

3. What are the advantages of quantum key distribution over traditional methods of key exchange?

Unlike traditional methods such as public key cryptography, QKD does not rely on computational complexity and is therefore immune to attacks by quantum computers. It also offers unconditional security, meaning that the security of the exchanged key is not based on unproven assumptions, but rather on the fundamental laws of physics.

4. Can quantum key distribution be hacked?

QKD is considered to be unbreakable by conventional means, as any attempt to intercept or measure the qubits would result in a change in their state, making it impossible for an eavesdropper to gain access to the key without being detected. However, it is still vulnerable to attacks on the devices or implementation, which is why rigorous security protocols are necessary.

5. What are the current applications of quantum key distribution?

QKD is currently being used for secure communication in various industries, including finance, government, and military. It is also being researched for use in areas such as secure cloud computing, secure teleconferencing, and secure voting systems.

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