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Cultural influences and faux pas.

  1. Americans(US)

    3 vote(s)
    17.6%
  2. Canadians

    4 vote(s)
    23.5%
  3. Dutch

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Aussies

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  5. English

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Irish

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Jamaicans

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  8. Yeah right I hate everyone equally.

    1 vote(s)
    5.9%
  9. Other: please explain

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  10. If you think I'm answering that your sorely mistaken...

    3 vote(s)
    17.6%
  1. Feb 16, 2007 #1
    OK I've had a bit of a culture shock recently, in England it's considered the done thing to generally either mock yourself or mock people in general, mainly in a light hearted and playful way, usually it's reciprocated with some reposte or some banter, and particularly it's aimed at someone who is being a little pompous or egotistical, although this doesn't seem to go down well elsewhere in the world.

    Just a question... Why is that, do you think? For Example the French have the same or a very similar culture of sarcasm, which is probably why the US has an aversion to the French, claiming them to be arrogant and pompous ironically enough, where as when I talk to the French, in my half broken Francais they always seem to be really amenable and have a great sense of humour.

    Do you think the differences of opinion of countries are because of culture as well as politics, or is it just politics?

    Personally I find some Americans - although not so much on this forum - a bit conceited and arrogant, free with their opinion and not open to joking about themselves? But this is obviously a cultural difference so you tend to overlook it.

    Anyway what do you think about certain cultures you meet on line, do you have a stereotypical view or do you take each person as they come, bearing in mind their cultural traits?

    Are there any cultures you really can't stand, such as chavs or red necks or Metalheads , or punks or Belgians or Aussies or Angolans, or whatever: doesn't have to be from another country, what annoys you about x? Or what do you like about y?

    Lastly which is the most easy to get along with country?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2007 #2

    Moonbear

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    I don't think you'd find many differences in humor or sarcasm across cultures. People are people. I think the differences that come about are usually language barriers or missing subtelties of tone of voice due to accent variations. So, someone says a joke, but you think they're serious, because they haven't quite perfected the accent sufficiently to put the emphasis on the right words to make it sound like the joke it is. The same is an issue online. Someone says a joke, but you don't know where to read the inflection in the sentence (often due to lack of adequate grammar to find the emphasis), and take them seriously, and the flame war follows (worse when one person doesn't realize they're in a flame war and thinks they're just trading jibs with another who is equally enjoying it).
     
  4. Feb 16, 2007 #3

    FredGarvin

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    I don't think I can have a serious conversation with my friends without some serious sarcasm and insults being thrown around. If my friends didn't call me "short bus" or make fun of my mom at least once every ten minutes, I'd be worried something is wrong. We usually have the most fun when trying to top each others' put downs. My wife does not understand this at all.
     
  5. Feb 16, 2007 #4
    Yes but there are definitely some differences I've noticed, for example if I say George Bush is a nutbar, US citizens generally are more likely to find this offensive, particularly Republicans or Bush supporters, there's a suggestion that taking the mickey out of an American President is off limits, whether Bush is a nutbar or not seems to be beside the point - he is a nutbar though :smile: - over in the UK if you didn't rip the hell out of MP's and particularly PM's, people would think you odd, in fact our entire newspaper media is founded on mocking King and Parliament, it's a tradition as old as the printing press.

    And some people just don't like being poked fun at, even if they are being a bit of an asshat, they find it deeply offensive, and I find this more often happens with Americans, maybe because the sarcasm is different or they think your deliberately trying to offend them? It's obviously not a language barrier and I seldom have this difficulty when talking on line to an English native, so I have come to the conclusion that there are some definite differences in humour and culture, or that I am just paranoid, one of the two :biggrin:

    Aussies for example are generally ruthlessly sarcastic, and they will rip you a new one given half the chance, but they'll do it in such away as to have you rolling around in hysterics. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  6. Feb 16, 2007 #5
    :uhh:
    I thoughts english and french people were best enemies :surprised
    Did you forget the Hundred Years' War :confused:
    :wink:
    I am quite convinced that cultural differences can make huge gaps. It is definitely clear that I don't get japaneese humor. But more important than whether's one's culture is canadian or russian (say, where the person grew up), is whether the person's has culture at all. :redface: I mean, it very interesting to meet someone with a lot of culture, be him indian of even... belgian :biggrin:
     
  7. Feb 16, 2007 #6

    J77

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    Did you see last weeks Top Gear, when they drove through Alabama...

    :surprised :surprised :surprised :surprised :surprised

    Strange people.

    ...but let me throw in some of my views/stereotypes:

    Americans(US) - "what?!? there are other countries?!?"
    Canadians - don't meet much of these. when you do they have canadian flags stuck to their backpacks - like their trip to europe is sponsered by their government.
    Dutch - straight talking; only say stuff which is important; I wouldn't live anywhere else at the moment.
    Aussies - don't invite an aussie to stay with you. they have this system where if you invite one, by default the whole country's allowed to sleep on your floor.
    English - i wouldn't want to slate my homeland too much, so i'll stop there... :)
    Irish - look angry, seem to think they're hard done by.
    Jamaicans - don't people shoot you in jamacia?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  8. Feb 16, 2007 #7
    No and it got pulled from Youtube if it's the one in the Youtube classics thread :frown:
     
  9. Feb 16, 2007 #8

    Kurdt

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    Yeah that was the video I put up. Twas hilarious.

    EDIT: there is another one on youtube if you search for it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  10. Feb 16, 2007 #9
    LMAO Funny clip. Even as an American, I would avoid Alabama, hell I would try to avoid the entire south. The US has plenty of distinct groups of people, so saying you get along with all Americans would be difficult to do. Also, I really don't know anyone English, Canadian, Australian, etc, so I can't say how I get along with them.
     
  11. Feb 16, 2007 #10
    I finally watched that Top Gear clip, :rofl: Jesus, are they the same people as the rest of the US? I've heard of red neck but that reminded me of deliverance :eek:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  12. Feb 16, 2007 #11
    yes i did see that, and it was rather shocking
     
  13. Feb 16, 2007 #12

    radou

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    Man, this video sucks. :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  14. Feb 16, 2007 #13

    Hootenanny

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    What no votes for the English :grumpy: :mad: :devil: ?!

    #storms off to get shotgun...#
     
  15. Feb 16, 2007 #14

    EL

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    I think all finish people I've met have been really layed back, so I'll go for them!
     
  16. Feb 16, 2007 #15

    BobG

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    I picked Canadians, but they're the only nationality I've had a lot of contact with other than Americans. I think it has to do with environmental climate more than nationality, since there's a lot of variations among Americans, as well. I have trouble understanding people that have spent too much time on the beach.
     
  17. Feb 16, 2007 #16

    Evo

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    Where are the French and Spanish?? :tongue:
     
  18. Feb 16, 2007 #17
    Something weird I found out a long time ago is that just because someone has a maple leaf on their pack doesn't mean they are Canadian. I had a teacher in high school a long time ago that travelled a lot, and he said that many times he would meet someone with a Canadian flag on their backback and they are Americans about 40% of the time.
     
  19. Feb 16, 2007 #18

    turbo

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    It is popular advice here in the US. If you're going to go hiking, sightseeing, etc, in Europe, the natives will probably be nicer to you if they think you're Canadian, and not a US citizen. It started around the time of the Vietnam war IIR, and it may be good advice today, too.
     
  20. Feb 16, 2007 #19
    Cant believe i am the only one to say Jamaican. Bar the yardy gangsters (even they are laid back) The Jamaica's take life in their stride, and are very laid back, probably a lot to do with the rasta lifestyle. I can understand Americans not seeing this, but for the uk people here...
     
  21. Feb 16, 2007 #20
    I have nothing against Jamaican, I just don't know any ! Why would they hang around in Europe anyway ? :rolleyes:

    I have unfortunately not met any jamaican fellow :cool:
     
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