Dark Matter and X-ray emissions

In summary, the conversation is about a video by two researchers who found anomalous x-ray emissions that may be related to dark matter. The results are set to be released in the Journal of Physics Review Letters, but there is some dissent and controversy surrounding the findings. The conversation also mentions a preprint and an update on the topic.
  • #1
jim mcnamara
Mentor
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This is a video by the two of the researchers who found anomalous xray emissions. These emissions may be
related to dark mater, needs further verification.

Edit 12/14/14 : preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.4119
 
Last edited:
Space news on Phys.org
  • #2
See also Update on the bananas
The significance of the detection depends, more than we'd wish, on dirty astrophysics involved in modeling the standard x-ray emission from galactic plasma.
 
  • #3
Boyarsky and Ruchayskiy are reportedly releasing their results on the 3.5 Kev line in the Journal of Physics Review Letters next week. It should be interesting to see if, and what they have to say in reply to dissent that has arisen since the original papers appeared on arxiv back in February.
 
  • #4
I look forward to that paper as well. The one posted I kept in my collection.
 
  • #5
mfb said:
The couch in the video looks a little like Dirac... :DD
Nevertheless it seems like they are overreacting about their results...
 

Related to Dark Matter and X-ray emissions

What is dark matter?

Dark matter is a type of matter that is hypothesized to make up a large portion of the universe. It does not interact with light and therefore cannot be directly observed, but its existence is inferred through its effects on visible matter.

How is dark matter related to X-ray emissions?

Dark matter is thought to interact with ordinary matter gravitationally, causing the visible matter to heat up and emit X-rays. These X-rays can help scientists map the distribution of dark matter in the universe.

Why is studying dark matter important?

Dark matter is important because it makes up about 85% of the total matter in the universe, yet we know very little about it. Understanding dark matter could help us better understand the formation and evolution of galaxies and the large-scale structure of the universe.

How are scientists studying dark matter and X-ray emissions?

Scientists use a variety of tools and techniques to study dark matter and its relationship to X-ray emissions. These include X-ray telescopes, computer simulations, and data analysis methods.

What are some current theories about the nature of dark matter?

There are several theories about the nature of dark matter, including the possibility that it is made up of particles such as WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) or axions. Other theories propose modifications to our understanding of gravity, such as MOND (Modified Newtonian Dynamics), to explain the observed effects of dark matter.

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