Derealization parts of brain? (schizophrenia)

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  • #1
LightningInAJar
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I have read people with schizophrenia and DID may experience thinking that the world has become less real. Are certain parts of the brain acting up that could be making reality seem less real?
 
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  • #2
Extreme tiredness and fatigue can do that too for everybody so the function/issue should exists in some ways, but please, don't account everything to some 'certain parts' by default. Our brain/psyche/chemistry is complicated enough as-is without looking for some anatomic pieces right away...
 
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  • #3
LightningInAJar said:
I have read
Where?

I hope it isn't "I know a guy who knows a guy".
 
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  • #4
Vanadium 50 said:
Where?

I hope it isn't "I know a guy who knows a guy".
No it was an NIH article. I realize DID is quite rare and many think it's a false diagnosis, but the idea of how the brain accepts things as real outside of itself is very interesting to me.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases...sense that your body,not be your own memories

This isn't what I read before but it describes the condition even outside of a clinical diagnosis.
 
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  • #5
LightningInAJar said:
how the brain accepts things as real outside of itself
I'm a solipsist. Why are you bothering me.
But seriously.
Do you really think we are anywhere close to asigning a brain locus to "awareness of reality" ?
 
  • #6
hutchphd said:
I'm a solipsist. Why are you bothering me.
But seriously.
Do you really think we are anywhere close to asigning a brain locus to "awareness of reality" ?
Well certain conditions make things seem less real, some drug use makes people think things are "realer than real." There must be blood tests and fmri data on people in these conditions to show evidence as to a cause?
 
  • #7
I'm quite certain that fMRI could be made to show anything you want it to show. (It is junk science IMHO). What "blood tests" can you administer to ascertain "realer than real"? I do not think we can get there from here.
 
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  • #8
hutchphd said:
I'm quite certain that fMRI could be made to show anything you want it to show. (It is junk science IMHO). What "blood tests" can you administer to ascertain "realer than real"? I do not think we can get there from here.
Do you imagine how connected a person feels to the world is reflected in how functional they are? Perhaps geniuses feel particularly connected to external reality? Meanwhile autistic people might have trouble breaking through? I know genius and autistic brains have been scanned with one imaging type or another.
 
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  • #10
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Related to Derealization parts of brain? (schizophrenia)

1. What is derealization and how does it relate to schizophrenia?

Derealization is a dissociative symptom characterized by a feeling of detachment from one's surroundings. It is often described as feeling like the world is unreal or dreamlike. In schizophrenia, derealization can occur as part of a larger symptom known as psychosis, which includes delusions and hallucinations.

2. What parts of the brain are involved in derealization?

Derealization is believed to involve dysfunction in multiple areas of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, and limbic system. These areas are responsible for perception, emotion, and memory, and their dysfunction can contribute to the feeling of detachment and unreality in derealization.

3. Is derealization a common symptom of schizophrenia?

Derealization is a relatively common symptom in schizophrenia, with studies estimating that it affects up to 70% of individuals with the disorder. However, it can also occur in other mental health conditions and is not specific to schizophrenia.

4. Can derealization be treated in schizophrenia?

There is currently no specific treatment for derealization in schizophrenia. However, addressing the underlying schizophrenia with antipsychotic medication and therapy can help improve overall symptoms, including derealization. Some individuals may also find relief from symptoms through mindfulness techniques and stress-reducing activities.

5. Is derealization a permanent symptom of schizophrenia?

Derealization can be a persistent symptom in schizophrenia, but it is not necessarily permanent. With proper treatment and management of schizophrenia symptoms, including derealization, individuals can experience periods of remission where their symptoms are significantly reduced or even disappear entirely. However, it is important to continue treatment to prevent relapse of symptoms.

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