Difference between inelastic and nonelastic

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inelastic_collision
    An inelastic collision, in contrast to an elastic collision, is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved.

    http://journals.aps.org/archive/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.114.1584
    nonelastic (total minus elastic).

    http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/nuclear-...ear-physics-fall-2006/lecture-notes/lec16.pdf
    Is inelastic just part of nonelastic ?
    nonelastic = inelastic + nuclear reaction [ (n,α),(n,γ), (n,p), (n,n'),fission ...]

    Is definition the same for charged and uncharged particles ?
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. mfb

    Staff: Mentor

    In high-energy physics, all those processes (apart from elastic scattering of course) would be called inelastic. I don't know about nuclear physics. In general, the same words can be defined slightly different between different authors.
     
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  4. Vanadium 50

    Vanadium 50 17,335
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The difference may be in quasi-elastic and diffractive collisions: these are ones where the incoming particles emerge intact, but the collision was not elastic.
     
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