Do our fingers ever touch electrons or nucleis?

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In summary, at the atomic level, our fingers do not actually touch anything when we come into contact with objects. This is because of the repulsive force between the electric fields of the particles in our fingers and the objects. This applies not only to electrons but also to the nucleus of an atom. The distance between the outermost layer of our skin and the outermost layer of the object we touch is usually about 0.1 nanometers, and we can never truly touch an electron or nucleus. Even in situations where it may feel like we are touching something, we are just experiencing the force between the electric fields of the particles.
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eha
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Hello everybody! We are discussing this topic but nobody sures what actually happens when we handle things what parts of atoms we actually touch? Or does magnetic sphere of atom stops our fingers to touch electrons and nucleis? How strong their magnetic shields are?
Thanks in advance if you provide any solid facts.
 
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WE never actuality touch anything, the negative to negative charge of electrons put up a repulsive force that prevents anything from touching anything else.
Except under extreme circumstances (heat or pressure).
 
  • #3


I can provide some insights on this topic. Our fingers do not actually touch electrons or nuclei when we handle objects. This is because of the repulsive force between the negatively charged electrons in our fingers and the electrons in the object. The same principle applies to the positively charged nuclei.

However, it is important to note that electrons and nuclei are not solid particles, but rather they are surrounded by a cloud of probability known as the electron cloud. So, while we may not physically touch the electrons or nuclei, our fingers do interact with this electron cloud.

In terms of the strength of the magnetic shields of atoms, it varies depending on the type of atom and its electronic configuration. Some atoms have stronger magnetic fields than others, but in general, they are not strong enough to prevent our fingers from coming into contact with the electron cloud.

I hope this provides some clarification on the topic. It is always important to seek out solid scientific facts and evidence when discussing scientific concepts.
 

Related to Do our fingers ever touch electrons or nucleis?

1. Do our fingers actually touch anything?

Technically, no. At the atomic level, everything is made up of particles that are surrounded by electric fields. When you touch an object, the electrons in your fingers repel the electrons in the object, creating a tiny gap between them. So, while it may feel like we are touching something, we are actually just experiencing the force between the electric fields of the particles.

2. Can we ever truly touch an electron?

No, we cannot. Electrons are fundamental particles that are constantly in motion and have no defined surface. When we come close to an electron, we are interacting with its electric field, but we can never truly touch it.

3. What about the nucleus of an atom?

The nucleus of an atom is also made up of particles surrounded by an electric field, so the same principle applies. We cannot physically touch the nucleus of an atom, but we can interact with its electric field.

4. How close do we get to electrons and nucleuses when we touch something?

The distance between the outermost layer of our skin and the outermost layer of the object we touch is usually about 0.1 nanometers. This is incredibly small and is due to the repulsive force between the electric fields of the particles in our fingers and the object.

5. Is there ever a situation where our fingers come into direct contact with electrons or nucleuses?

No, there is not. As mentioned before, the electric fields of particles always interact with each other, creating a tiny gap between them. Even in scenarios where we may think we are touching something, we are actually just experiencing the force between the electric fields of the particles.

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