Does anything happen in the quantum world?

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In summary: These are useful concepts. But are limited by the inherent quantum uncertainty. They are superficial.
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DiamondHead
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Was Neils Bohr justified to claim that the quantum world does not exist?

Are we stuck in a loop when having to use classical-world tools to probe and understand the micro world?

Does anything happen in the quantum world?
 
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  • #2
DiamondHead said:
Does anything happen in the quantum world?
What does that even mean? The "quantum world" is just a description of things very small, all of which do LOTS of things. Ever heard of electricity? An electron is a quantum object.
 
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  • #3
phinds said:
What does that even mean? The "quantum world" is just a description of things very small, all of which do LOTS of things. Ever heard of electricity? An electron is a quantum object.
I was looking for a scientific answer specifically one related to quantum theory.

Does the theory say that anything is moving? Or that anything exists?
Does the math say what exists?
 
  • #4
DiamondHead said:
Does the theory say that anything is moving? Or that anything exists?
Does the math say what exists?
Math does not say what exists. NATURE says what exists. Where possible, we use math to describe what nature creates. Do you think electrons do not move?
 
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  • #5
phinds said:
Math does not say what exists. NATURE says what exists. Where possible, we use math to describe what nature creates. Do you think electrons do not move?

What does NATURE say it is that exists in the quantum world?

Does the uncertainty principle allow things to exist? And... well 'move'?
 
  • #6
DiamondHead said:
What does NATURE say it is that exists in the quantum world?
Protons, neutrons, photons, electrons, neutrinos ... Do you not know how to use Google?
DiamondHead said:
Does the uncertainty principle allow things to exist? And... well 'move'?
The uncertainly principle has nothing to do with whether or not things exist and whether or not they move.
 
  • #7
@DiamondHead it appears from you questions that you are not going to get very far asking semi-random questions on an Internet forum. Your time would be better spent actually learning some basic physics.
 
  • #8
DiamondHead said:
What does NATURE say it is that exists in the quantum world?

Does the uncertainty principle allow things to exist? And... well 'move'?
Ummmm.... atoms, nuclei, a large number of subatomic particles, just to list the obvious Physical things. Then there are fields, energy, momentum, spin, etc, etc. Pretty much everything you're likely to have been taught exists. Why would you doubt it?

The UP talks about the uncertainty of the value of different properties of an object. It does not say that an object does not exist or move.

-Dan
 
  • #9
topsquark said:
Ummmm.... atoms, nuclei, a large number of subatomic particles, just to list the obvious Physical things. Then there are fields, energy, momentum, spin, etc, etc. Pretty much everything you're likely to have been taught exists. Why would you doubt it?

The UP talks about the uncertainty of the value of different properties of an object. It does not say that an object does not exist or move.

-Dan

I know what the uncertainty principle does not say and I never asked what it does not say.
I asked if the UP allows quantum 'things' or systems to exist.
And 'move'.

I will ask in another way hopefully it will be easier to understand - does the UP prevent the scenario where quantum 'things' exist and move?
 
  • #10
phinds said:
@DiamondHead it appears from you questions that you are not going to get very far asking semi-random questions on an Internet forum. Your time would be better spent actually learning some basic physics.
I think you need to think more deeply about the uncertainty principle.
 
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  • #11
phinds said:
Protons, neutrons, photons, electrons, neutrinos ... Do you not know how to use Google?

These are useful concepts. But are limited by the inherent quantum uncertainty. They are superficial.
phinds said:
The uncertainly principle has nothing to do with whether or not things exist and whether or not they move.

Hmmm
 
  • #12
Thread closed for Moderation...
 
  • #13
Thread will remain closed. Turns out this newbie was another sockpuppet account of a previously banned (multiple times) member who posted similar nonsense. Thanks anyway folks. :smile:
 
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1. What is the quantum world?

The quantum world refers to the microscopic realm of particles and energy that make up the building blocks of the universe. It is governed by the principles of quantum mechanics, which describe the behavior of these particles and energy at a subatomic level.

2. What happens in the quantum world?

In the quantum world, particles can exist in multiple states or locations at the same time, a phenomenon known as superposition. They can also become entangled, meaning their properties are linked even when separated by large distances. Additionally, quantum particles can behave like waves and exhibit unpredictable behavior, such as tunneling through barriers.

3. How does the quantum world affect our everyday lives?

Although the quantum world may seem far removed from our daily experiences, it actually plays a crucial role in many modern technologies. For example, transistors in computers and smartphones rely on the principles of quantum mechanics to function. Quantum technologies are also being developed for secure communication, precise measurements, and faster computing.

4. Can we observe or measure the quantum world?

Yes, we can observe and measure the effects of the quantum world through experiments and technology. However, due to the unpredictable nature of quantum particles, we can never fully know their exact state or behavior at any given moment. This is known as the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

5. Are there any practical applications of quantum mechanics?

Yes, there are many practical applications of quantum mechanics, including quantum computing, cryptography, and sensing. These technologies have the potential to greatly impact fields such as medicine, finance, and energy. Researchers are also exploring the potential of quantum mechanics for solving complex problems in fields like chemistry and materials science.

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