Double slit and wave particle duality

In summary: But we are just chasing the same old cart down the road if we think we need to justify ourselves to make these things fit every person who wants to know what's 'really' going on.
  • #1
rootone said:
There is no measurement method in which they display both wavelike and point like behavior simultaneously.
Just for my knowledge, not to confuse the OP, why would you say, for example, the double slit experiment does not show both of these properties in one measurement method?

[Mentors' more: this thread was forked off from another thread]
 
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  • #2
Isaac0427 said:
Just for my knowledge, not to confuse the OP, why would you say, for example, the double slit experiment does not show both of these properties in one measurement method?
The usual double slit experiment very clearly demonstrates wavelike behaviour with light.
I guess you might see point like behaviour at extremely low frequencies though I'm not sure if it that would be too low to actually measure anything.
 
  • #3
rootone said:
The usual double slit experiment very clearly demonstrates wavelike behaviour with light.
When the experiment is run with electrons, though, you get wavelike behavior from a large number of single-electron measurements over time, but particlelike locality with each single-electron measurement.
 
  • #4
Isaac0427 said:
When the experiment is run with electrons, though, you get wavelike behavior from a large number of single-electron measurements over time
You get wave-like behavior in the probability of an electron landing at any particular location. That's not the same thing as saying that the electrons themselves are behaving like waves.

Bohemian mechanics works just fine to explain the double-slit experiment, and it clearly distinguishes between the wave and the electrons; the wave steers the electrons to produce the observed many-electron patterns.
 
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  • #5
Nugatory said:
You get wave-like behavior in the probability of an electron landing at any particular location. That's not the same thing as saying that the electrons themselves are behaving like waves.

Bohemian mechanics works just fine to explain the double-slit experiment, and it clearly distinguishes between the wave and the electrons; the wave steers the electrons to produce the observed many-electron patterns.
But we are just chasing the same old cart down the road if we think we need to justify ourselves to make these things fit every person who wants to know what's 'really' going on. "It's quantum mechanics" is the only answer.
 
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1. What is the double slit experiment?

The double slit experiment is a well-known experiment in quantum physics that demonstrates the wave-like behavior of particles. It involves shining a beam of particles, such as electrons, through two parallel slits and observing the resulting interference pattern on a screen.

2. How does the double slit experiment demonstrate wave-particle duality?

The double slit experiment shows that particles, such as electrons, can exhibit both wave-like and particle-like behavior. This means that they can behave as waves, interfering with each other, and also as discrete particles, hitting the screen at specific points. This phenomenon is known as wave-particle duality.

3. What is the significance of the double slit experiment?

The double slit experiment is significant because it challenges our classical understanding of particles and their behavior. It suggests that particles can exist in multiple states at once, known as superposition, and that our observations can influence their behavior. This has profound implications for our understanding of the nature of reality.

4. Can the double slit experiment be replicated with other particles?

Yes, the double slit experiment has been replicated with various particles, including photons, neutrons, and even large molecules. This further supports the idea of wave-particle duality and shows that it is not limited to just one type of particle.

5. How does the observer affect the outcome of the double slit experiment?

The observer plays a crucial role in the double slit experiment. When the particles are not observed, they behave as waves and produce an interference pattern. However, when the particles are observed, they behave as particles and do not produce an interference pattern. This suggests that our observations have a direct influence on the behavior of particles.

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