Eigenstates, Block equations, Regge-theories

In summary, translating between different levels of thread prefixes can be either easy or difficult, depending on the starting level. There is a debate about whether to delete odd or even words when translating from "I" to "B", but many prefer deleting even words to preserve correct grammar. Translating from "B" to "A" is currently the most challenging, but there is potential for an AI bot to assist with this. This situation reminds me of advice for writing a master thesis, which involves simplifying and then adding in mistakes for easier review.
  • #1
DaveC426913
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PF has gotten so far over my head, I keep expecting to see this: :frown:
translate-PF.jpg
 

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  • #2
My browser has gone a step further; see what I am offered:

upload_2018-9-18_0-35-40.png
 

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  • #3
I think Greg is working on a new feature for the PF software:
  • Translate to "B" level
  • Translate to "I" level
  • Translate to "A" level
Depending on the starting thread prefix level, these translations can be fairly easy, or pretty hard. Translating from "I" to "B" so far looks like all we have to do is delete every other word. There is an ongoing debate in the Mentor forums about whether to delete odd or even words. I've voted for even words in the poll, since deleting the first word in each sentence often interferes with correct grammar.

Translating from "B" to "A" so far is the most problematic, although we are beta testing an AI bot that shows some promise...

o0)
 
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  • #4
berkeman said:
I think Greg is working on a new feature for the PF software:
  • Translate to "B" level
  • Translate to "I" level
  • Translate to "A" level
Depending on the starting thread prefix level, these translations can be fairly easy, or pretty hard. Translating from "I" to "B" so far looks like all we have to do is delete every other word. There is an ongoing debate in the Mentor forums about whether to delete odd or even words. I've voted for even words in the poll, since deleting the first word in each sentence often interferes with correct grammar.

Translating from "B" to "A" so far is the most problematic, although we are beta testing an AI bot that shows some promise...

o0)
Reminds me on an advice I once gave on how to write a master thesis: "Write it down, so you will easily understand it. Then remove every third line. Finally implement some obvious mistakes, so that the reviewer has something to criticize. That's the only way to ensure you won't have to write an entire different paper after the prof is done with his remarks."
 
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1. What are eigenstates in quantum mechanics?

Eigenstates in quantum mechanics refer to states in which a physical system has a definite value for a particular observable. In other words, it is a state in which the system's properties are well-defined and can be measured.

2. How are eigenstates related to eigenvalues?

Eigenvalues are the possible values that can be measured for a particular observable in a given eigenstate. Each eigenstate has its corresponding eigenvalue, which represents the physical quantity associated with that state.

3. What are block equations?

Block equations, also known as Bloch equations, are a set of mathematical equations used to describe the time evolution of a quantum system. They are commonly used to model the behavior of spin systems in the presence of external fields.

4. How are block equations used in quantum computing?

In quantum computing, block equations are used to describe the dynamics of qubits, which are the basic units of quantum information. By manipulating the external fields that affect the qubits, we can control their evolution and perform operations on them.

5. What is the role of Regge theory in physics?

Regge theory is a mathematical framework used to study the scattering of particles at high energies. It provides a way to understand the behavior of particles when they collide and interact with each other. It has been applied to various areas of physics, including particle physics, nuclear physics, and gravitation.

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