Electrostatics and nuclear force problem

In summary, the electric force between two protons separated by a distance of 2.00x10-15 m is calculated using the equation F = (kq1q2) / r2, where the charge of a proton is +1.6x10-19 Coulombs. The attractive nuclear force is stronger than the repulsive electric force, allowing the nucleus to stay intact.
  • #1
hawkeye1029
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1

Homework Statement


Two protons in an atomic nucleus are typically separated by a distance of 2x10-15 m. The electric repulsion force between the protons is huge, but the attractive nuclear force is even stronger and keeps the nucleus from bursting apart. What is the magnitude of the electric force between two protons separated by
2.00x10-15.

Homework Equations


F = (kq1q2) / r2

The Attempt at a Solution


I have no experience in electrostatics...I'm not sure how to solve this without knowing the charges of the two protons. Is there a certain way to?
Thank you to all who read this and/or reply :).
 
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  • #2
The charge of a proton is related to the charge of an electron. You should be able to find the value in your textbook or a quick web search.
 
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  • #3
Oh, I understand. So because the charge of an electron is -1.6x10-19, the charge of a proton would be +1.610-19?
And this charge can be used for q1 and q2.
 
  • #4
hawkeye1029 said:
Oh, I understand. So because the charge of an electron is -1.6x10-19, the charge of a proton would be +1.610-19?
And this charge can be used for q1 and q2.
Yes, that's right. When giving the value of something, always include the units.
 
  • #5
Oh haha. The charge of an electron is -1.6x10-19 Coulombs therefore the charge of a proton is +1.6x10-19 Coulombs.

Thank you :).
 
  • #6
Good. If I ask someone how old they are and they say, "twenty three", I ask them what units they are using. Could that be why I don't have many friends?
 
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  • #7
LOL. Now every time I say my age, I'll think of you and make sure to add years onto the end.
 
  • #8
:smile:
 

Related to Electrostatics and nuclear force problem

1. What is electrostatics and nuclear force problem?

Electrostatics and nuclear force problem is a fundamental issue in physics that deals with the interaction between electrically charged particles and the strong nuclear force, which is responsible for holding the nucleus of an atom together. It is a complex problem that is still not fully understood by scientists.

2. How do electrostatics and nuclear force interact?

The electrostatic force is responsible for the attraction or repulsion between electrically charged particles, while the nuclear force is responsible for holding protons and neutrons together in the nucleus of an atom. These two forces interact with each other, and their balance determines the stability of an atom.

3. What is the role of electrostatics and nuclear force in atoms?

The electrostatic force is crucial in determining the arrangement and behavior of electrons around the nucleus of an atom. On the other hand, the nuclear force is responsible for keeping the protons and neutrons together in the nucleus, preventing them from flying apart due to their positive charges.

4. What are the challenges in understanding electrostatics and nuclear force?

One of the main challenges in understanding electrostatics and nuclear force is that these two forces operate at very different scales. The electrostatic force operates at the atomic level, while the nuclear force operates at the subatomic level, making it difficult to reconcile their behaviors and interactions.

5. What are some real-life applications of electrostatics and nuclear force?

Electrostatics and nuclear force have many practical applications in our daily lives. For example, the principles of electrostatics are used in the functioning of electronic devices, while nuclear force is used in nuclear power plants and medical imaging techniques such as PET scans. Understanding these forces also helps us in developing new technologies and improving existing ones.

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