Familiarity with the Greek alphabet

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  • #1
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It seems that people fall into three categories for how they learned the Greek alphabet:
1) Math/science courses
2) General Education/history
3) Sorority/Fraternity

I know that some people may fall into more than one category, but I suppose you can tell a bit about a person by asking what they think when they hear "theta."

/observation/
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Chi Meson
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I guess I fall into a weird category for learning the Greek alphabet: I took Greek in high school.
 
  • #3
I like Serena
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What about simply learning (ancient) greek at school as a language, and then go on into a science education?
 
  • #4
jtbell
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In the USA, few schools below university level offer Greek classes.

My best friend in high school did study Greek, but he's Greek-American, so on Saturdays he went to "Greek school" at his church.

It was a long time ago, but I'm pretty sure I picked up the Greek alphabet one letter at at time, as I encountered them in my math and physics courses in high school and first couple of years of college.
 
  • #5
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i just learned to recite it by rote because i recognized it would be important. and then i became most familiar with whatever i used in courses.
 
  • #6
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I actually learned the entire alphabet from engineering AND being in a fraternity. I always had to juggle pronunciations as well, they didn't always pronounce them the same.
 
  • #7
ideasrule
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I once decided, a couple of years ago, to learn the Greek alphabet and a few Greek words. Don't ask me why; I don't really know myself.
 
  • #8
I like Serena
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So how about the Hebrew alphabet? Since aleph is used in math.
 
  • #9
jhae2.718
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All I know are [itex]\aleph[/itex] and [itex]\beth[/itex]...
 
  • #10
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Does the written Greek alphabet differ between ancient and modern?

Pronunciation of the latter is no doubt lost, and I recently heard physics letter pronunciation differing surprisingly from that of the spoken language.
 
  • #11
I like Serena
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Does the written Greek alphabet differ between ancient and modern?

Pronunciation of the latter is no doubt lost, and I recently heard physics letter pronunciation differing surprisingly from that of the spoken language.

I've just looked it up on (where else) wikipedia.
There is also an audio fragment there, where the alphabet is pronounced in modern Greek.

It turns out that the written Greek alphabet is unchanged (except for the diacritics, but they are not part of the alphabet).
Pronunciation is more or less the same (softer consonants), except for the vowels.
Apparently eta, iota, and upsilon are all pronounced the same now as .
And that omicron and omega are also pronounced the same as [o].
 
  • #12
Most people probably learn Pi in elementary school before anything else Greek.
 
  • #13
BobG
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Originally from my encyclopedias when looking up the history of the alphabet when in grade school, but 'alpha' and 'beta' (for obvious reasons) and 'Delta' were about the only ones I remembered.

I didn't really become familiar with them until math and science classes.
 

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