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A Finding an exoplanet via its magnetosphere's effect on starlight?

  1. Sep 29, 2016 #1
    Following the same way to detect a black hole via gravitational lens. Is it possible? Use the same methodology to detect exoplanet via its magnetic field and the distortion caused in the light of Star?
    Can we find a phase or polarization change in part of a light from a star caused by an magnetosphere of exoplanet? Can we test with Mercury magnetosphere?
     
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  3. Sep 30, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

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    Good question. I wonder, does the light need to be polarized already, or can unpolarized light (like the kind emitted from a star) undergo polarization changes from magnetic fields?
     
  4. Oct 1, 2016 #3

    DrClaude

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    By what effect would the magnetosphere affect the polarization of the light?
     
  5. Oct 1, 2016 #4
    I think that following research may give some directions.
    http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/v8/n9/full/nphoton.2014.177.html
    But this is in a controlled environment.
    How to apply it in a heterogeneous environment is the big question.
    If we can build an polarized image. Who knows if an magnetic field distortion pattern can be identified?
    Experiments are required and Mercury and its magnetic field are a candidate.
    One important thing, the Jupiter Magnetosphere is one of biggest pehenomenos in our solar system getting close to Saturno. The magnetosphere can let the planets bigger and and more easy to be observed.

    Let's see who with technical conditions will go ahead with such research. The idea was launched or shared!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  6. Oct 1, 2016 #5

    Drakkith

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    So you found a reference which really doesn't support your idea at all? How is that helpful?

    In science it's important to make sure your references support your idea before making such claims. Sharing an idea before you even understand the subject only adds noise.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  7. Oct 4, 2016 #6
    See: This is a question about how can we detect or see the magnetosphere of an planet. The mentioned research is only to show that may have some alternatives. But the question remains, what kind of interference the magnetoshere of planets can cause in the light from a star?
    For example the Magnetosphere cause interference in the solar wind changing the densidad in the region of magnetosphere probably causing a light diffraction. Can we detect or do we have equipments to detect so weak changes?
     
  8. Oct 4, 2016 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    What on earth?
     
  9. Oct 4, 2016 #8

    Drakkith

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    Even if such an effect happens, I don't think so. We can barely even detect the smaller, Earth-sized ones, let alone look at an effect like this. The transit of the planet across the face of the star puts would put out a much stronger signal than any effect the magnetic field would have.
     
  10. Oct 4, 2016 #9
    This is the issue using optical point of view transit will be better but we can't forget that in some cases magnetosphere is many times greater than the planet. Another point the intensity of starlight is the biggest challenging when observing small planets transit. But in case of magnetosphere the starlight will help the observation. Mercury planet may be a good candidate to start something.

    We cant forget that there is an atmosphere in a star system produced by solar wind and it is strongly affected by planet's magnetosphere. Even if this very rarified in opposite way it covers long distances. Probably maybe another way to see other star systems not aligned in the same view plan than us. Probably there will be an spiral of diffraction from star systems where we have planet's with magnetosphere.

    When the light of a star pass over a space with density variation it will produces a small refraction. Can we see it we current technology?
     
  11. Oct 4, 2016 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    Magnetic fields do not deflect or otherwise alter light, despite what any personal theory you have developed says.

    Can we get this discussion back on track and limited to things that are, you know, true?
     
  12. Oct 13, 2016 #11
    In a solar system there is atmosphere between planets. It is very weak with low density if we compare with planet's atmosphere but may have almost the same quantity of hidrogen, helium and oxigen if we consider the long distance between them. The light from star will be affected by such atmospheres changes like the light is affect by planet atmoshere. The Solar wind is eletrically charged, are Ions. The magnetosphere will distorce, will change the desnity of solar wind causing ligth refractions when observed from long discances. For example the Jupiter magnetosphere is 18.000 times greater than earth magnestosphere it is greater than even the sun.
    Finding ways to identify such distortion will help to find exoplanets.
     
  13. Oct 14, 2016 #12

    DrClaude

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    Do you have an idea how weak such an effect would be?

    There is no evidence of that.

    Time to close the thread.
     
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