Finding Tension of a string tied to a wall

In summary: So, in summary, when looking at just the rope join, there are three forces acting (TA to the left, TB downward, and TW to the right at an angle of Θ degrees above horizontal). Using the equations ∑Fx = ∑Fy = 0, we can find TW by using trigonometry with Θ and TB. The weight of block A has no effect on TA and may not be necessary for this problem.
  • #1
DERC511
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In the figure we see two blocks connected by a string and tied to a wall, with θ = 33°. The mass of the lower block is m = 0.9 kg; the mass of the upper block is 4.0 kg. Find the tension in the string that is tied to the wall.
-I have the forces of Block A as Tension, Normal Force, and Gravity (mg). From my calculations I have that Tension equals 0 (which I don't think is correct) and the Normal Force being equal to 39.2.
- For Block B I have the forces as Tension and Gravity, which gives me the Tension being equal to 8.82
- Finally,I separated the tension of the rope on the wall to the x and y components with X: Tcos33 and Y: Tsin33
- We can assume this is all in static equilibrium. Any advice on mistakes or how to proceed with this problem is much appreciated!

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  • #2
Look at the just the rope join.

There are three forces acting, let's call them TA to the left, TB downward, and TW to the right, Θ degrees above horizontal.

Using ∑Fx = ∑Fy = 0 you can find TW from theta and T B using trig, you don't need to know anything about TA.
 
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  • #3
billy_joule said:
Look at the just the rope join.

There are three forces acting, let's call them TA to the left, TB downward, and TW to the right, Θ degrees above horizontal.

Using ∑Fx = ∑Fy = 0 you can find TW from theta and T B using trig, you don't need to know anything about TA.
Thank you for the reply. So you're saying that I can't calculate TB By equating the Weight of the block to it?
 
  • #4
DERC511 said:
Thank you for the reply. So you're saying that I can't calculate TB By equating the Weight of the block to it?

If it's in static equilibrium then the weight of block A has no effect on TA and is only given to confuse or challenge you, or maybe it's required for a later question.
 

Related to Finding Tension of a string tied to a wall

What is the purpose of finding the tension of a string tied to a wall?

The purpose of finding the tension of a string tied to a wall is to understand the forces acting on the string and to ensure that it is strong enough to support the weight or load it is carrying.

What factors affect the tension of a string tied to a wall?

The tension of a string tied to a wall is affected by the weight or load it is carrying, the length and thickness of the string, and the angle at which it is tied to the wall.

How do you calculate the tension of a string tied to a wall?

The tension of a string can be calculated using the formula T = mg + ma, where T is the tension, m is the mass of the object being supported, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and a is the acceleration caused by the load.

What is the unit of measurement for tension?

The unit of measurement for tension is Newtons (N) in the metric system and pounds (lbs) in the imperial system.

Why is it important to know the tension of a string tied to a wall?

Knowing the tension of a string tied to a wall is important for safety reasons, as it ensures that the string is strong enough to support the weight or load it is carrying. It is also important for accurately predicting the behavior of the string under different conditions.

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