Finding the constants in an expression

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  • Thread starter ArnoldEdv
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  • #1
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I have a problem with this formula:
upload_2018-8-31_16-41-40.png

I have two known value series: A1, B1, C1 and A2, B2, C2.
That gives me two equations with two unknowns n and k.
upload_2018-8-31_16-50-51.png
upload_2018-8-31_16-51-39.png

Mentor note:
More readable versions of the two equations:
$$A_1 = \sqrt[n]{\frac{B_1} k + C_1^n}$$
and
$$A_2 = \sqrt[n]{\frac{B_2} k + C_2^n}$$
Does anyone have a clue how to solve this?
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
14,585
11,938
I have a problem with this formula:
View attachment 230078
I have two known value series: A1, B1, C1 and A2, B2, C2.
That gives me two equations with two unknowns n and k.
View attachment 230079 View attachment 230080
Does anyone have a clue how to solve this?
You get a function ##k=k(n)## from the equations and then ##A_1^n-C_1^n=\gamma (A_2^n-C_2^n)## which I assume can only be solved numerically.
 
  • #3
mathman
Science Advisor
7,924
467
note: ##\gamma=\frac{B_1}{B_2}##.
 
  • #4
2
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Thank you for your answers.
I was hoping that there was some way of solving this equation that I didn't know of.
Probably there isn't.
 

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