Finding the mass of a object without a scale or density

In summary, the task is to determine the mass of 2 objects using lab equipment and 50g mass pieces without the use of a scale. The equations needed for this task are unknown and the only possible solution suggested involves Newton's laws. However, it is also suggested to table the project instead of forcing an answer.
  • #1
Wern
2
0

Homework Statement


I must determine the mass of 2 objects with lab equipment and 50g mass pieces a scale may not be used as well as density.

Homework Equations


have no idea


The Attempt at a Solution


have no idea
 
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  • #2
do you at least have some entertaining thoughts or shots-in-the-dark?

I have somewhat a of a purist physics professor, who (out of the class room) argues that mass isn't really a fundamental unit... only length and time are, and other so-called 'fundamental units' like mass can be expressed in terms of length and time. (Hint: in the case of mass, you won't need time)

You're lucky enough to have a standard (a 50 g wait) to be your basis ratio of lengths.
 
  • #3
The only tring I could think of was Newtons 3 Laws , becuase that is what we are busy with in class
 
  • #4
I think I would table this whole project rather than force an answer?
:rolleyes:
 

Related to Finding the mass of a object without a scale or density

What is the formula for finding the mass of an object without a scale or density?

The formula for finding the mass of an object without a scale or density is mass = volume x density. However, in order to use this formula, you will need to know the object's volume and density, which can be difficult to determine without a scale.

Can I estimate the mass of an object without a scale or density?

Yes, you can estimate the mass of an object without a scale or density by using known objects that have a similar size and material. For example, if you have a small rock that you know weighs 100 grams, you can use it as a reference to estimate the mass of another small rock of a similar size and material.

Is there a way to find the mass of an irregularly shaped object without a scale or density?

Yes, you can find the mass of an irregularly shaped object without a scale or density by using the water displacement method. This involves placing the object in a container of water and measuring the change in water level. The change in volume is equal to the volume of the object, which can then be used in the mass formula.

What are some common household items that can be used to estimate the mass of an object without a scale or density?

Some common household items that can be used to estimate the mass of an object without a scale or density include coins, paper clips, and food items such as sugar or flour. You can use these items as references to estimate the mass of other objects with a similar size and material.

Can I use a ruler to measure the mass of an object without a scale or density?

No, a ruler cannot be used to measure the mass of an object without a scale or density. A ruler measures length, not mass. However, a ruler can be used to measure the dimensions of an object, which can then be used to calculate the object's volume and ultimately its mass using the appropriate formula.

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