Finite Black Holes? Answers for Xap's Question

In summary, the concept of black holes having infinite mass is incorrect. While they may appear to have infinite mass due to their singularity, it is actually the density of mass in a small volume that defines a black hole. The laws of math break down at the singularity, making it difficult to accurately determine the mass. However, some theories suggest that the mass has shrunk to a point, leading to an infinite mass density. Further research on black holes, particularly on a quantum scale, may help us better understand this phenomenon.
  • #1
Xaphan
2
0
please forgive my ignorance but, i was watching somthing in tv the other day about supermasive black holes, now my question is, if some black holes are more massive than others, how can their mass be infinite? if Blackhole A is more massive than black hole B then surly they can't both be infinite in mass.

been reading the fourm for months and never posted basicly because i leave it to the people who know what they are talking about and I am sure you guys will put me straight

thanks, Xap
 
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  • #2
Black holes do not have infinite mass! Could you explain where you got this idea.
 
  • #3
i was under the impression that a black hole is a singualrity and thus "infinite" in mass
but I am getting the idea I am very wrong
 
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  • #4
This Black Holes FAQ appears to be accurate and will answer your basic questions:

http://cosmology.berkeley.edu/Education/BHfaq.html#q5

There is a theory of black holes on a quantum scale that might be tested with the newest and biggest particle colliders. So they can be tiny. To me, the singularity means the laws of math break down, but I'm not sure what becomes infinite in the actual equations. Apparently it is not the mass.

I would add that it is the density of mass in a small volume which defines a "black hole." The curvature of space-time does not allow light (EM waves) to escape inside a radius known as the event horizon. The FAQ either describes or implies this interpretation.
 
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  • #5
According to some theories, the black hole mass has shrunk to a point (the singularity) and therefore the mass DENSITY is infinite. Current physics has this as an open question.
 
  • #6
mathman said:
According to some theories
:smile: You make GR sound so unrespectable.
 
  • #7
Xaphan said:
i was under the impression that a black hole is a singualrity and thus "infinite" in mass
but I am getting the idea I am very wrong
A singularity is just a place where things stop behaving nicely. It's derived from the word "singular", meaning something like "being out of the ordinary" or "departing from general usage or expectation".

In this case, it signifies the fact that if we don't put a hole in our mathematical representation of space-time, then there will be one or more points inside that are mathematically obnoxious.
 
  • #8
cesiumfrog said:
:smile: You make GR sound so unrespectable.
GR and quantum theory are both very accurate in their respective regimes. However, inside a black hole when they are needed together, the theory breaks down, particularly when describing the singularity.
 

Related to Finite Black Holes? Answers for Xap's Question

1. What is a finite black hole and how is it different from a regular black hole?

A finite black hole is a theoretical concept in which the singularity at the center of a black hole has a finite size, rather than being infinitely small. This means that the gravitational pull at the singularity is not infinite, and the effects of gravity may be less extreme compared to a regular black hole.

2. How do finite black holes form?

The formation of finite black holes is still a topic of research and debate. One theory suggests that they may form from the collapse of a massive star, but there are also other proposed mechanisms such as primordial black holes formed during the early stages of the universe.

3. Can we observe or detect finite black holes?

As of now, there is no direct evidence or observation of finite black holes. The concept of finite black holes is still largely theoretical and requires further research and technological advancements for potential detection.

4. What are the potential implications of finite black holes?

If finite black holes do exist, they could have significant implications for our understanding of space and time, as well as the laws of physics. They may also play a role in the evolution and fate of the universe.

5. Are finite black holes dangerous?

It is currently unknown if finite black holes pose any danger to our universe. Some theories suggest that they may eventually evaporate due to Hawking radiation, while others propose that they could potentially merge with regular black holes and grow in size. However, without any direct observation or evidence, the potential danger of finite black holes remains a topic of speculation.

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