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Five of the World's Deadliest Volcanoes

  1. Jun 21, 2017 #1

    Astronuc

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    I happen to stumble across this article: The world’s five deadliest volcanoes … and why they’re so dangerous
    https://theconversation.com/the-worlds-five-deadliest-volcanoes-and-why-theyre-so-dangerous-74901

    It's either that folks live near the volcano, or folks visit.

    KILAUEA has been active for some time now, and lava apparently is routinely flowing to the ocean.
    https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/elevated.html

    https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm - one can visit, but there are areas on/over which one should not walk.

    https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/

    I didn't know about the fifth one: Changbaishan, China
    Edit: Changed title of thread to be more accurate. The title was "World's Five Deadliest Volcanoes".
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 21, 2017 #2
    I didn't either. It's potentially the most powerful of the set and it's right on the China/North Korean border.
     
  4. Jun 21, 2017 #3

    fresh_42

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    I find this criterion "volcano" a bit strange (my opinion). I assumed to find the Phlegraean Fields instead of Vesuvius and definitely Yellowstone, and Anak Krakatoa as the headline, not Krakatoa, but this might be hair splitting. You are right
    which doesn't affect much people (maybe with the exception of Naples and Popocatepetl). As far us I know, a major eruption of Anak Krakatoa could affect us all, and definitely Yellowstone and the Phlegraean Fields would, plus propbably some less famous plumes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017
  5. Jun 21, 2017 #4

    davenn

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    yup, I felt the same way with Anak Krakatoa and primarily its predecessor being the only really deadly one in that list
    there are many other seriously dangerous / potentially dangerous volcanoes to consider. Two of which fresh_42 pointed out ....
    Vesuvius and definitely Yellowstone

    + Mount Tambora

    The Volcanic Explosivity Index goes up to 8. On that scale, the 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora rates a very destructive 7. The explosion took place on the island of Sumbawa (then in the Dutch East Indies, now in Indonesia) and plunged the region into darkness, but its effects were anything but isolated. Tens of thousands of people were killed by the apocalyptic eruption, subsequent tsunamis and ensuing starvation and disease. The largest volcanic eruption in recorded history changed the world's climate so much (even crops in Europe and North America failed) that 1816 became known as "the year without a summer." Tambora itself shrank several thousand feet and traded its peak for a massive crater at its summit.

    Thera would be high on my list

    Some 3,500 years ago, an event of cataclysmic proportions rocked the Mediterranean. The volcano at Thera (later known as the Greek island of Santorini) exploded with what is estimated at four to five times the eruptive force of Krakatoa in 1883, blowing a hole into the Aegean isle and sending out shock waves that, according to historians, would reverberate for centuries to come. The great seafaring Minoan civilization, the dominant Greek culture of the time, potentially withered away after clouds of ash enveloped its cities and great tsunami waves smashed its fleets. Stories of a world-shaking eruption linger in legends across the Mediterranean.

    Mount Pelée

    Mount Pelée, standing more than 4,500 feet high on the French Caribbean island of Martinique, erupted violently in May 1902, killing nearly 30,000 people — effectively the entire port city of St. Pierre. The catastrophe was so devastating that the term pelean — to describe that particular kind of ash, gas and fiery cloud eruption — became part of volcanic vernacular. There had been warnings of steam, light earth shocks and raining ash, but they were ignored. After the town was wiped out, Pelée went dormant for some months, until geologists discovered a lava dome, dubbed the tower of Pelée, that rose to more than 1,000 feet above the crater floor before eventually crumbling in March 1903.


    Dave
     
  6. Jun 22, 2017 #5

    Astronuc

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    I was thinking about Tambora (Indonesia) and Pinatubo (Philippines), and also Huaynaputina (Peru).

    Here is a list of deadliest volcanic eruptions on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanic_eruptions_by_death_toll
     
  7. Jun 22, 2017 #6

    davenn

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    not familiar with this one, will have a read
     
  8. Jun 27, 2017 #7
    https://volcanocafe.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-pain-filled-issue-with-ischia/

    This blog is several years old but, IIRC, uplift continues. Ischia's dormant central volcano has the potential to kill many, many people, many ways. Land-slides, flank eruptions, flank collapses, pyroclastic flows etc etc. To paraphrase the technical detail, if it makes trouble suddenly, there's nowhere to run. Worse, the entire Bay of Naples area is horribly vulnerable to any Eastbound debris or tsunami...
     
  9. Jun 28, 2017 #8

    davenn

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    interesting article, thanks for sharing :smile:

    The wonderful things about vulcanology these days is that unless a volcano is completely unmonitored,
    it's difficult to get caught off-guard. Monitoring volcanoes of interest means that they give early warning
    of possible impending activity ... magma movement = harmonic tremor and other many small quake
    swarms would announce a warning :smile:

    The real problem lies in that many countries don't have the funding available for such
    studies/monitoring -- and unfortunately Italy is a classic example of this.
    And this is how the population can get caught off-guard by " sudden trouble" :frown:
    It wasn't really sudden, the precursors were just not being monitored


    Dave
     
  10. Jun 28, 2017 #9

    fresh_42

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    If the Phlegraean Fields erupt, no warning will ever be early enough: you cannot evacuate over three million people. I'm not sure your information about funding is correct, as the major ones (Phlegraean Fields, Vesuvius, Stromboli, Etna) are certainly monitored. At least I've seen the measure points on tv. But what is really bad is, the following story (no fake):
    https://www.theverge.com/2014/11/11...ologists-manslaughter-laquila-earthquake-fear
     
  11. Jun 28, 2017 #10

    davenn

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    just a noted generalisation in 3rd world / economically not well off countries

    If there is monitoring, and their may well be ..... wouldn't be surprised if it isn't funded by USA and other better off countries
    Italy has a huge financial problem that is well known

    yeah, I'm well familiar with that history and it is partly what comment the way I did .... tis very unfortunate


    Dave
     
  12. Jun 28, 2017 #11

    fresh_42

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    But Italy has the fourth largest economy in Europe, and eighth worldwide, ahead of Spain or Russia.
     
  13. Jun 28, 2017 #12

    davenn

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    this is getting seriously off topic
     
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