A Future of the electron neutrino mass limits

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Summary
Upper bound of the electron neutrino mass was calculated, 0,086 eV. https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02578 This team also plans to calculate the lower bound of the electron neutrino mass. It is interesting what is the future of these calculations and measurements.
In five years also experiment KATRIN will give either the upper bound of electron neutrino mass (0,2 eV) or even the mass of the electron neutrino. https://www.katrin.kit.edu/

My question is, what we can expect from the astronomical and non-astronomical measurements to improve these data? I suppose that measurements of gravitational waves will give new data, LIGO, VIRGO, KAGRA, LISA? I suppose that James Webb telescope will give new data, useful for neutrino mass? Then, IceCube neutrino observatory is useful? There are also neutrino oscillations measurements, as NOvA and Hyper-Kamiokande.

Which measurements are the most promising and which are less promising, according to neutrinos rest masses?
 
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Orodruin

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There is no such thing as the "mass of an electron neutrino". The electron neutrino is not a mass eigenstate. Instead what these experiments measure is an effective neutrino mass, which is a particular combination of the masses of the neutrino mass eigenstates. The exact combination depends on the type of experiment performed. For example, cosmology is typically sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, whereas beta decay experiments target a particular combination involving the lepton mixing matrix. Neutrino oscillations are only sensitive to the mass squared differences, not to the masses themselves. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments target yet another combination of the masses.

Neutrino telescopes such as IceCube are sensitive mainly to high-energy neutrinos, where the masses are negligible for kinematical purposes.

Edit: grammar
 
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Vanadium 50

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\Upper bound of the electron neutrino mass was calculated, 0,086 eV. https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02578
You are misrepresenting what they wrote. Orodruin is right, there is no such thing as the "mass of an electron neutrino". Furthermore, the author of that paper never claim that is what they are calculating, and indeed, the words "electron neutrino" don't even appear.
 
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You are misrepresenting what they wrote. Orodruin is right, there is no such thing as the "mass of an electron neutrino". Furthermore, the author of that paper never claim that is what they are calculating, and indeed, the words "electron neutrino" don't even appear.
As I look now, does ##m^\nu_0## mean either ##m^\nu_1## or ##m^\nu_3##, dependent on normal hierarchy (NH) or inverted hierarchy (IH)?
 

Vanadium 50

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Itr is defined on page 2, line 8.

You simply have to put more effort. I don't think it's PF's job to read the paper for you.
 

berkeman

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Thread closed.
 
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