Geo Stationary Orbit: 83.0°E Satellite Location

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In summary, a geo stationary orbit is an orbit around the Equator which a satellite occupies. It is only one number which needs to be known in order to find the satellite. Once known, the bearing and elevation needed to point at the satellite can be calculated usingGoogle Maps.
  • #1
xMonty
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Hi,
I know what geo stationary orbit is, my question is what does it mean when they say

satellite is at "83.0°E", don't you need more coordinates to find it??
 
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  • #2
xMonty said:
Hi,
I know what geo stationary orbit is, my question is what does it mean when they say

satellite is at "83.0°E", don't you need more coordinates to find it??

For a Geostationary orbit, the satellite must be in orbit around the Equator (so it will appear to be fixed in the sky. Its orbital distance is also fixed, of course. All that remains is to know at which angular position, around the Equator that it's stationed - hence just one number is needed.
 
  • #3
sophiecentaur said:
For a Geostationary orbit, the satellite must be in orbit around the Equator (so it will appear to be fixed in the sky. Its orbital distance is also fixed, of course. All that remains is to know at which angular position, around the Equator that it's stationed - hence just one number is needed.

So what does 83 deg means? can you elaborate a bit more or maybe point me to a web page which offers more information, i want full details and calculations, how can i find a satellite in my sky if i have the degrees (83)

thanks for you time
 
  • #4
It means Longitude 083E. Vertically above that point on the Earth's Equator.
Google Maps have a satellite finder facility (search for it - it's there) in which you put your position (Lat / Long) and the satellite position (083). It will tell you the bearing and elevation needed to point at the satellite.
You can check by looking at other nearby dishes if you don't feel too confident.
 
  • #5
sophiecentaur said:
It means Longitude 083E. Vertically above that point on the Earth's Equator.
Google Maps have a satellite finder facility (search for it - it's there) in which you put your position (Lat / Long) and the satellite position (083). It will tell you the bearing and elevation needed to point at the satellite.
You can check by looking at other nearby dishes if you don't feel too confident.

Great answer helped me formulate my real question exactly :)

If i have Lat/Long info and the sat position(83) what's the formula to use to get the bearing and elevation. (I am actually making a satellite finder app for the smart phones, you could simple point your phone in the sky and it will show you satellites over the camera view)

thanks again for your valuable time !
 
  • #6
Could be a really handy App.
I searched "satellite finder" but I could find only sites that would do it for you - bummer.
I did a nav course about 40 years ago (pre-GPS) and I had some notes until recently on how to determine your position from star sightings. This is the same geometry, pretty much. It isn't simple but I'm sure there are approximations which would suit a mobile phone app accuracy.

Stop press. I found this link at the end of a search. I think it may be just what you need but you'll have to dig around in there. Of course the formulae are much easier than for astro nav because you don't need to consider TIME haha.
 
  • #7
sophiecentaur said:
Could be a really handy App.
I searched "satellite finder" but I could find only sites that would do it for you - bummer.
I did a nav course about 40 years ago (pre-GPS) and I had some notes until recently on how to determine your position from star sightings. This is the same geometry, pretty much. It isn't simple but I'm sure there are approximations which would suit a mobile phone app accuracy.

Stop press. I found this link at the end of a search. I think it may be just what you need but you'll have to dig around in there. Of course the formulae are much easier than for astro nav because you don't need to consider TIME haha.

The link looks promising, thanks a bunch !
 

Related to Geo Stationary Orbit: 83.0°E Satellite Location

1. What is a Geo Stationary Orbit?

A Geo Stationary Orbit is a circular orbit around the Earth at an altitude of approximately 36,000 kilometers. This orbit is directly above the Earth's equator and has an inclination of 0 degrees, meaning it is in line with the Earth's rotation. Satellites placed in this orbit appear to be stationary from a fixed point on Earth, making them ideal for communication and broadcasting purposes.

2. What does the "83.0°E Satellite Location" refer to?

The "83.0°E Satellite Location" refers to the longitude of the satellite's position in the Geo Stationary Orbit. This means that the satellite is located above the Earth at a point where the longitude is 83.0 degrees east.

3. Why is 83.0°E a popular location for satellites?

83.0°E is a popular location for satellites because it is directly above the Indian Ocean and provides coverage to a large portion of Asia, including India, China, and parts of Southeast Asia. It also allows for easy communication between the eastern and western hemispheres.

4. How is a satellite placed in a Geo Stationary Orbit at 83.0°E?

To place a satellite in a Geo Stationary Orbit at 83.0°E, it must first be launched into orbit with a rocket. Once in space, the satellite will use its own propulsion system to adjust its orbit and position itself at 83.0°E. This requires precise calculations and adjustments to ensure the satellite remains in the desired orbit.

5. What are the advantages of satellites in a Geo Stationary Orbit at 83.0°E?

There are several advantages to having satellites in a Geo Stationary Orbit at 83.0°E. These include providing continuous coverage to a large geographic area, allowing for real-time communication and broadcasting, and reducing the need for multiple satellites to cover the same area. Additionally, the stationary position of the satellite allows for easier tracking and communication compared to satellites in other types of orbits.

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