Geostationary Orbits: Benefits & Challenges

In summary, the conversation discusses a calculation for the length of AC in an orbital diagram. The calculation is based on the formula $C = \pi \cdot d$, where $d$ is the length of the orbital diameter AC. The conversation also mentions using inverse cosine to determine the angle measure. The final result for the length of AC is 84,300 km.
  • #1
Pasha
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0
Hi, everyone can you help me with this question, please?
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  • #2
(i) This calculation is straightforward ... what do you get for the length of AC?

(ii) recall $C = \pi \cdot d$, where $d$ is the length of the orbital diameter AC.

(iii) $BC = \sqrt{|AC|^2-|AB|^2}$

(iv) note ... $\cos(\angle{BAC}) = \dfrac{|AB|}{|AC|}$. Use inverse cosine on your calculator to determine the angle measure.
 
  • #3
skeeter said:
(i) This calculation is straightforward ... what do you get for the length of AC?

(ii) recall $C = \pi \cdot d$, where $d$ is the length of the orbital diameter AC.

(iii) $BC = \sqrt{|AC|^2-|AB|^2}$

(iv) note ... $\cos(\angle{BAC}) = \dfrac{|AB|}{|AC|}$. Use inverse cosine on your calculator to determine the angle measure.

(i) for this one i got 84.300 is it right ?
 
  • #4
Yes. Since the orbit is 35,800 km above the Earth surface, the distance from the Earth's surfacr to C, although it is not shown in the picture is also 35,800 km so the distance from A to C is 35,800+ 12,700+ 35,800= 84,300 km.
 

Related to Geostationary Orbits: Benefits & Challenges

1. What is a geostationary orbit?

A geostationary orbit is a type of orbit in which a satellite orbits the Earth at the same rate and direction as the Earth's rotation. This results in the satellite appearing to remain stationary in the sky when viewed from a fixed point on Earth.

2. What are the benefits of geostationary orbits?

Geostationary orbits have several benefits, including providing continuous coverage of a specific region on Earth, making them ideal for communication and weather satellites. They also require less fuel to maintain their position compared to other types of orbits, making them more cost-effective.

3. What are the challenges of using geostationary orbits?

One of the main challenges of geostationary orbits is the limited coverage area. Since the satellite remains fixed above a specific region, it cannot provide coverage to areas that are not within its field of view. Additionally, the high altitude of geostationary orbits (approximately 36,000 kilometers) makes it difficult to establish a connection with ground stations.

4. How are geostationary orbits used in the field of Earth observation?

Geostationary orbits are commonly used for Earth observation, particularly for monitoring weather patterns and climate changes. Satellites in these orbits can provide continuous and real-time data, making them valuable for forecasting and disaster management.

5. Can multiple satellites be placed in geostationary orbits?

Yes, it is possible to have multiple satellites in geostationary orbits, as long as they are spaced out enough to avoid interference with each other. This is commonly seen in communication systems where multiple satellites are used to provide coverage to different regions of the Earth.

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