What are the factors affecting geostationary satellite orbits?

In summary, the correct statements about geostationary satellites are: (d) they are not able to view the north and south poles due to their location on the equator, and (e) their orbit is independent of their mass due to the balance of gravitational and centripetal forces.
  • #1
songoku
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Homework Statement


Which of the following statements about geostationary satellite is correct?
a. geostationary satellites must orbit from east to west
b. the orbital radius of a geostationary satellite can be varied as long as its period is 24 hours
c. it is a constellation of at least two satellites
d. any geostationary satellites are not able to view the north and south poles
e. the mass of a geostationary satellite does not have to be fixed.

Homework Equations


gravitational force
centripetal force

The Attempt at a Solution


I think the answer is (d). Geostationary satellite is located on equator so it can't view the poles. But I am not sure about (e). From equation gravitational force = centripetal force, the mass of satellite will cancel out so the orbit is independent of the mass of satellite, so maybe (e) is the correct one?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
Both (d) and (e) are correct. You can have more than one correct statements.
 
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  • #3
Thanks for your help
 
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Related to What are the factors affecting geostationary satellite orbits?

1. What is a geostationary satellite?

A geostationary satellite is a type of satellite that orbits the Earth at the same rate as the Earth's rotation, allowing it to remain in a fixed position above a specific location on the Earth's surface.

2. How does a geostationary satellite work?

A geostationary satellite works by staying in orbit at a specific distance from the Earth's surface, allowing it to maintain a fixed position above a certain location. It achieves this by traveling at the same speed as the Earth's rotation, which keeps it in sync with the Earth's movement.

3. What are the advantages of using geostationary satellites?

One of the main advantages of using geostationary satellites is that they provide continuous coverage over a specific area on the Earth's surface. This makes them ideal for telecommunications, weather monitoring, and other applications that require constant communication or observation from a fixed location.

4. What are the limitations of geostationary satellites?

One limitation of geostationary satellites is their high altitude, which can result in a longer signal delay compared to other types of satellites. Additionally, their fixed position means they are not as effective for covering polar regions. They also have a limited lifespan due to the depletion of their fuel reserves.

5. How are geostationary satellites launched?

Geostationary satellites are typically launched into orbit using rockets, much like other types of satellites. However, because of their high altitude, they require a larger rocket and more fuel to reach their designated orbit. Once in orbit, the satellite's onboard propulsion system is used to fine-tune its position and keep it in sync with the Earth's rotation.

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