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Glue a thin sheet of copper to a cork?

  1. Aug 8, 2009 #1
    Does anyone know what kind of glue i can use to glue a thin sheet of copper to a cork?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 8, 2009 #2

    Andy Resnick

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    Re: Adhesive

    What kind of load (tensile, shear, etc) and what kind of conditions (air, water, saline, hot, cold..) does the joint need to withstand?
     
  4. Aug 8, 2009 #3

    negitron

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    Re: Adhesive

    Contact cement works well under most conditions, provided the application doesn't require exposure to high temperatures or certain solvents. As with all adhesives, surface preparation is key; clean and dry is the general rule.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2009 #4

    Danger

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    Re: Adhesive

    I would tend to agree with Negitron on this. Contact cement is incredible stuff, as long as it isn't in a really inhospitable environment. Silicone sealant works well, as do basic LaPage's or Elmer's carpentry glue (although I'm not sure about their metal-bonding properties). If there aren't physical clearance issues, I'd also consider pop rivets with strain-relief washers.
     
  6. Aug 9, 2009 #5
    Re: Adhesive

    Will cement glue hinder the conductivity of copper at all?
     
  7. Aug 9, 2009 #6

    negitron

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    Re: Adhesive

    I'm not sure what you mean here. Glue will not conduct current from one piece of copper to another, however, it will have no effect on the conductivity of a single piece of copper.
     
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