Grad school application process (math)

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hi, so I'm just finishing up my junior year and would like to try to go to grad school for math. I got into an REU program this summer that ends around the beginning of August and plan to start studying for the GRE sometime during the summer.

Right now though, I'm a little confused as to how I should organize my schedule for this following year. My professors either applied as foreign students or are old enough that they aren't familiar with the application process, and my school only has a few other people interested in graduate school. (I also haven't found any good resources online, but I'm probably not looking hard enough).

So, when's a good time to take the general GRE/subject test GRE? When should I apply?
I was thinking about taking the test in the late fall, apply around january, and see if I get in? Is this how most people do it?

Also, how many schools do people apply to on average? Most people seem to say to apply to a couple safety net schools, a few reasonable ones, and maybe 1 or 2 that are most likely out of reach, so around 10 schools? I just want to get a rough idea so I can pick some schools out based on what the professors are researching.

edit: err wrong forum, sorry
 
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  • #2
Vanadium 50
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I don't think your professors are quite as clueless as you think. If your school has a PhD program, they see the whole process from the other side. Even if not, it's their job to know the drill. As far as when to apply, every single university has their deadlines on their web site. It's not a secret - you just have to look.

That said, I think you have a bigger problem, and that is, based on the questions you are asking in the homework help section, you are not prepared for a graduate program 18 months from now. You need to be talking to professors about how to get from where you are now to where you have to be.
 
  • #3
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Ok, thanks. I was hoping there was a consolidated site or something with this sort of info, but I guess not.
Yeah I'm a little worried about not being prepared that well, I figured I would just try and study for the GRE this summer to see if I handled the material well, and if I found out I wasn't cut out for it, then I guess I would just stop and try to do something else.
 
  • #4
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you havent even taken real analysis yet
 
  • #5
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So, when's a good time to take the general GRE/subject test GRE? When should I apply?
I was thinking about taking the test in the late fall, apply around january, and see if I get in? Is this how most people do it?
The General GRE can be taken at any time. In fact, they're revamping the General GRE this August (2011), so you might want to take it before then if you can just so all the study materials out there (e.g., the things you can find at the bookstore or at the library) are still relevant. In physics (and I assume it's true for math as well), the Verbal score is rather unimportant; just get as close to a perfect 800 on the Quantitative section as you can. Since you're a math person, it shouldn't be hard; it's easy algebra (e.g., comparing ratios) and very basic geometry.

The Subject GRE can only be taken three times a year, something like October, November, and in April. That's it. If you're a Junior now and will be a senior this fall, then you really don't have a choice when to take the Math GRE: November is the latest you can take it and have your score in time for grad school application deadlines (deadlines typically run from the first part of December to the first part of January).
 

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