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Graviton represented as a gluon pair

  1. Jan 16, 2015 #1
    I'm not a physicist, but I'm pathologically curious about such things. I've recently heard that there is a growing school of thought among theoretical physicists that the graviton (and resultant gravitational force) is actually just an extension of the strong force conveyed by a gluon pair. This concept seemed counter intuitive to me for many reasons, including the fact that the gravitational force gradually weakens at increasing distances.

    So, my question... Is this idea actually becoming even close to a consensus opinion, and how does the strong force then relate to the Higgs particle and to the space-time effects produced by gravitation?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2015 #2

    jtbell

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    Can you give a reference for this idea? It sounds highly speculative to me.
     
  4. Jan 16, 2015 #3

    Vanadium 50

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    By reputable theoretical physicists? Where? Please provide a better reference.

    This sounds like someone who didn't know what he was talking about picked some words out of papers by Dixon, Bern and Kosower, and then rearranged them. That's as close to real science that this idea will get.
     
  5. Jan 16, 2015 #4
    I wish I could, but no. I just heard about the "theory" while watching an episode of the "Through the Wormhole" series on the science channel. That's the problem with these pop-science shows. They often float fringe ideas as if they have consensus support.
    I take it that the concept is not a serious school of thought among theoretical physicists?
     
  6. Jan 16, 2015 #5

    mfb

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    Right.
    jtbell, V50 and I never heard of it and the concept sounds really odd. That is not a proof, but it is evidence against such a concept as serious physics. Currently there is nothing to discuss. If you find a reputable source, please write me a message and I will open the thread again.
     
  7. Jan 16, 2015 #6

    mfb

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    ChrisVer found something: Paper / arXiv

    As far as I understand it, it is just a mathematical similarity.
     
  8. Jan 16, 2015 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    I am reminded of the Monty Python sketch "Great Actors". "I don't want you to get the impression it's just a question of the number of words. Getting them in the right order is just as important."
     
  9. Jan 17, 2015 #8
    It probably has something to do with the fact that in many forms of string theory, a graviton is a closed string (a loop) and a gluon / gauge boson is an open string (segment of a loop), and you can create a loop by attaching the ends of two loop-segments to each other. Also that there are deep relations between field theory and string theory - something like this second part is needed for the stringy relation to have implications for field theory... But the details are still being worked out, last I heard.
     
  10. Jun 13, 2016 #9
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2016
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